sanctioned


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sanc·tion

 (săngk′shən)
n.
1. Authoritative permission or approval that makes a course of action valid. See Synonyms at permission.
2. Support or encouragement, as from public opinion or established custom.
3. A consideration, influence, or principle that dictates an ethical choice.
4.
a. The penalty for noncompliance with a law or legal order.
b. A penalty, specified or in the form of moral pressure, that acts to ensure compliance with a social standard or norm.
c. A coercive measure adopted usually by several nations acting together against a nation violating international law.
tr.v. sanc·tioned, sanc·tion·ing, sanc·tions
1. To give official authorization or approval to: voting rights that are sanctioned by law.
2. To encourage or tolerate by indicating approval: His colleagues sanctioned his new research.
3. To penalize, as for violating a moral principle or international law: "Half of the public defenders of accused murderers were sanctioned by the Texas bar for legal misbehavior or incompetence" (Garry Wills).

[Middle English, enactment of a law, from Old French, ecclesiastical decree, from Latin sānctiō, sānctiōn-, binding law, penal sanction, from sānctus, holy; see sanctify.]

sanc′tion·a·ble adj.
Word History: Occasionally, a word can have contradictory meanings. Such a case is represented by sanction, which can mean both "to allow, encourage" and "to punish so as to deter." Sanction comes from the Latin word sānctiō, meaning "a law or decree that is sacred or inviolable." This noun is related to the Latin verb sancīre, which basically meant "to render sacred or inviolable by a religious act," but was also used in such extended meanings as "to ordain," "to decree," and "to forbid under pain of punishment." Thus from the beginning, two fundamental notions of law were wrapped up in the word: law as something that permits or approves and law that forbids by punishing. In English, the word sanction is first recorded in the mid-1500s in the meaning "law, decree." Not long after, in the 1600s, it also came to be used to refer to the penalty enacted to cause one to obey a law or decree. From the noun, a verb sanction was created in the 18th century meaning "to allow by law," but it wasn't until the second half of the 1900s that it began to mean "to punish (for breaking a law)." English has a few other words that can refer to opposites, such as the verbs dust (meaning both "to remove dust from" and "to put dust on") and trim (meaning both "to cut something away" and "to add something as an ornament").
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sanctioned - conforming to orthodox or recognized rules; "the drinking of cocktails was as canonical a rite as the mixing"- Sinclair Lewis
orthodox - adhering to what is commonly accepted; "an orthodox view of the world"
2.sanctioned - formally approved and invested with legal authority
legal - established by or founded upon law or official or accepted rules
3.sanctioned - established by authoritysanctioned - established by authority; given authoritative approval; "a list of approved candidates"
authorised, authorized - endowed with authority

sanctioned

adjective
1. Generally approved or agreed upon:
2. Having or arising from authority:
3. Adhering to beliefs or practices approved by authority or tradition:
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Blanche had consented at last to listen to Arnold's entreaties, and had sanctioned the writing of a letter to London to order her wedding-dress.
All I could ascertain was that he looked on his niece's marriage as a settled thing, that her father had sanctioned it, that he sanctioned it himself, that it was a desirable marriage, and that he should be personally rejoiced when the worry of it was over.
Only at our University in some of the very highest and most esoteric classes -- which I myself have never been privileged to attend -- it is understood that the sparing use of Colour is still sanctioned for the purpose of illustrating some of the deeper problems of mathematics.
Wolf that he was, and unprecedented as it was, the gods had sanctioned his presence, and they, the dogs of the gods, could only recognise this sanction.
Eighteen of the shipping companies and vessels were sanctioned for coal exports from North Korea and the engagement in ship-to-ship transfers of petroleum products prohibited by UN sanctions.
All the countries that supply critical commodities (including cash) to sanctioned country X must agree to and abide by the sanctions, while making sure that those under its sway follow suit.
28 (ANI): Affordable housing in urban areas is gaining momentum in Uttar Pradesh with the state getting 41,173 more houses sanctioned under the Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana (Urban).
financial institution is prohibited from maintaining accounts for persons or businesses located in these highly sanctioned countries.
Thrive says the event will consider "the fairness and appropriateness of the need to administer a sanction, the lack of information available to sanctioned claimants, the length of time sanctioned claimants wait for a hardship payment or reversal of a sanctioned decision and the variable evidence that questions the effectiveness of the sanction".
Banks should be very careful transacting business with US sanctioned individuals, entities, or countries.
Summary: Stretch it further and the sanctioned country usually adapts to it easily enough
Dow Jones Risk & Compliance takes this a step further, covering all companies sanctioned by the US, UK or EU in which a sanctions target owns a stake of 10 per cent or more.