sanctity


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sanc·ti·ty

 (săngk′tĭ-tē)
n. pl. sanc·ti·ties
1. Holiness of life or disposition; saintliness.
2. The quality or condition of being considered sacred; inviolability.
3. Something considered sacred.

[Middle English saunctite, from Old French sainctite, from Latin sānctitās, from sānctus, sacred; see sanctify.]

sanctity

(ˈsæŋktɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the condition of being sanctified; holiness
2. anything regarded as sanctified or holy
3. the condition of being inviolable; sacredness: the sanctity of marriage.
[C14: from Old French saincteté, from Latin sanctitās, from sanctus holy]

sanc•ti•ty

(ˈsæŋk tɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. holiness, saintliness, or godliness.
2. sacred or hallowed character.
3. a sacred thing.
[1350–1400; Middle English saun(c)tite (< Old French sain(c)teté) < Latin sānctitās holiness]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sanctity - the quality of being holysanctity - the quality of being holy    
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
sacredness - the quality of being sacred

sanctity

sanctity

noun
1. The quality of being holy or sacred:
2. The quality or condition of being safe from assault, trespass, or violation:
Translations

sanctity

[ˈsæŋktɪtɪ] N (= sacredness) → lo sagrado; (= inviolability) → inviolabilidad f

sanctity

[ˈsæŋktəti] nsainteté f, caractère m sacré

sanctity

nHeiligkeit f; (of rights)Unantastbarkeit f; a man of great sanctityein sehr heiliger Mann; the sanctity of (human) lifedie Unantastbarkeit des (menschlichen) Lebens

sanctity

[ˈsæŋktɪtɪ] n (of person, marriage) → santità; (of oath, place) → sacralità
References in classic literature ?
To the high mountain peaks of faith and sanctity he would have climbed, had not the tendency been thwarted by the burden, whatever it might be, of crime or anguish, beneath which it was his doom to totter.
Father Mapple enjoyed such a wide reputation for sincerity and sanctity, that I could not suspect him of courting notoriety by any mere tricks of the stage.
High times, indeed, if unprincipled young rakes like him are to be permitted to invade the sanctity of domestic bliss; though do what the Bashaw will, he cannot keep the most notorious Lothario out of his bed; for, alas!
It merits particular attention in this place, that the laws of the Confederacy, as to the ENUMERATED and LEGITIMATE objects of its jurisdiction, will become the SUPREME LAW of the land; to the observance of which all officers, legislative, executive, and judicial, in each State, will be bound by the sanctity of an oath.
To the Chinese such commonplace things as marriage, friendship, and home have an infinitely deeper meaning than can be attached to them by civilisation which practically lives abroad, in the hotels and restaurants and open houses of others, where there is no sanctity of the life within, no shrine set apart for the hidden family re-union, and the cult of the ancestral spirit.
He declares in ze manifessto zat he cannot fiew wiz indifference ze danger vreatening Russia and zat ze safety and dignity of ze Empire as vell as ze sanctity of its alliances..." he spoke this last word with particular emphasis as if in it lay the gist of the matter.
His knowledge of books, however superficial, was sufficient to impress upon their ignorance respect for his supposed learning; and the gravity of his deportment and language, with the high tone which he exerted in setting forth the authority of the church and of the priesthood, impressed them no less with an opinion of his sanctity. Even the common people, the severest critics of the conduct of their betters, had commiseration with the follies of Prior Aymer.
These were searched and sought out through the whole nation, by the prince and his wisest counsellors, among such of the priesthood as were most deservedly distinguished by the sanctity of their lives, and the depth of their erudition; who were indeed the spiritual fathers of the clergy and the people.
Of course Shelley's mind was full of the sanctity of the moment, and indignant that "the hour for which the years did sigh" should thus be broken in upon by vulgar revelry; but while we may sympathise with his view, and admit to the full the sacredness, not to say the solemnity, of the marriage ceremony, yet it is to be hoped that it still retains a naturally mirthful side, of which such public merriment is but the crude expression.
And at the very touch of criticism, the paternal sanctity was lessened; yet the paternal terror only grew; and the two strands of feeling pushed him in the same direction.
If we violate the sanctity of this ceremonial, by any hostile movement on our part, it is we who incur the charge of faithlessness; and we doubt not that in both these instances the white men have been considered by the Blackfeet as the aggressors, and have, in consequence, been held up as men not to be trusted.
Once I asked, referring to the smell of peppermints, `Is that the odor of sanctity?' I didn't like to eat Uncle Mark's peppermints because he just fished them loose out of his pocket, and had to pick some rusty nails and other things from among them before he gave them to me.