sanguinely


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san·guine

 (săng′gwĭn)
adj.
1.
a. Cheerfully confident; optimistic: sanguine about the prospects for an improved economy.
b. At ease; accepting: "Deborah was generally sanguine about the women in Franklin's life" (Walter Isaacson).
2. Archaic
a. Having blood as the dominant humor in terms of medieval physiology.
b. Having the temperament and ruddy complexion formerly thought to be characteristic of a person dominated by this humor; passionate.
3.
a. Of the color of blood; red.
b. Of a healthy reddish color; ruddy: a sanguine complexion.

[Middle English, blood-red, dominated by the humor blood, ruddy, from Old French sanguin, from Latin sanguineus, bloody, blood-red, from sanguis, sanguin-, blood.]

san′guine·ly adv.
san′guine·ness, san·guin′i·ty n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

sanguinely

advoptimistisch; sayzuversichtlich
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sanguinely

[ˈsæŋgwɪnlɪ] advottimisticamente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
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References in classic literature ?
Bates was engaged to spend the evening at Hartfield, James had due notice, and he sanguinely hoped that neither dear little Henry nor dear little John would have any thing the matter with them, while dear Emma were gone.
I then ask him what happens to the drones who don't manage to have sex with the queen, he shrugs and sanguinely says that they just hang around the hive and eventually die.
The first urban transport system of the world, based on light rail transit, was sanguinely introduced in Canada's city, Edmonton, in 1978.
(98) This is how 'Merely Colonial', writing to the editor of the Telegraph (Brisbane), 7 June 1899, 7 feared things would turn out, and the outcome more sanguinely predicted by the Evening News (Sydney), 28 May 1898, 6--with copious references to the American Civil War.
I was lucky I could pass as sanguinely "ethnic," which only incurred occasional obvious racism, plus frequent microaggressions, but anyway homophobia was a more virulent and potentially deadly force in my life and so got more stuck in my accumulated attitudes.
Indeed, it may be more sanguinely thinkable to prefer physical killings and other maladjusted treatments by a handful uniformed sociopaths of just few hundreds of defenceless citizens to underhand sentencing of millions of entirely hapless humans to economic fiascos by occupiers of political offices who have ceaselessly unleashed such horrendous acquisitiveness as often excused in grandiloquent, if inane, verbiage, drooled by dark mouths in the continent of the dark!
But in Laura Ingalls Wilder: A Biography (1992), longtime Wilder scholar and aficionado William Anderson acknowledges, sanguinely, that
Less sanguinely, they also call attention to the ominous possibility that the past may not be wholly past.
'My husband and I decided to chill for a bit, and know that the right time will come,' Marquez sanguinely pondered.
Indicatively, Broch, in his long Hofmannsthal essay and in the essays on kitsch and myth, was also at pains to differentiate between Romanticism as a more or less clearly delineated period in cultural history (to which he tends to relate more sanguinely, without accusatory pathos), and Romanticism as shorthand for a bundle of attitudes that continue to manifest themselves and shape the cultural landscape long after Romanticism proper had come to an end.
Al-Sabti, who has run the Hewar Gallery in Baghdad for decades and has weathered invasions, occupations and terror attacks, notes sanguinely that "over 5,000 works of art have been stolen from Iraq", mostly since 2003.
EPAP chairman emeritus Jose Maria Zabaleta has wishful thinking that the Philippine ethanol producers can sanguinely replicate the success of other markets - the best parallelism of which could be Thailand's story - a neighbor in the region.