sapless


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sap·less

 (săp′lĭs)
adj.
1. Devoid of sap; dry.
2. Lacking spirit or energy.

sap′less·ness n.

sap•less

(ˈsæp lɪs)

adj.
1. without sap; withered.
2. lacking vitality; insipid.
[1585–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sapless - lacking bodily or muscular strength or vitality; "a feeble old woman"; "her body looked sapless"
frail - physically weak; "an invalid's frail body"
2.sapless - destitute of sap and other vital juices; dry; "the rats and roaches scurrying along the sapless planks"- Norman Mailer
juiceless - lacking juice
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Four times did the botas bear being uplifted, but the fifth it was all in vain, for they were drier and more sapless than a rush by that time, which made the jollity that had been kept up so far begin to flag.
They looked as if they had never known what youth or pleasure was, but had been the offspring of Nature's dotage, and always the gray, decrepit, sapless, miserable creatures, who now sat stooping round the doctor's table, without life enough in their souls or bodies to be animated even by the prospect of growing young again.
The tender shoots and the expanding flowers are nipped and withered, and of a vine that yearned to stretch its tendrils round the world there is left but a sapless stump.
Also we shall have to reject all the terrible and appalling names describe the world below--Cocytus and Styx, ghosts under the earth, and sapless shades, and any similar words of which the very mention causes a shudder to pass through the inmost soul of him who hears them.
The English author, on the other hand, without supposing him less of a conjuror than the Northern Warlock, can, you observed, only have the liberty of selecting his subject amidst the dust of antiquity, where nothing was to be found but dry, sapless, mouldering, and disjointed bones, such as those which filled the valley of Jehoshaphat.
The middle and lower branches were in luxuriant life, and an excess of vegetation had fringed the trunk almost to the ground; but a blight had apparently stricken the upper part of the oak, and the very topmost bough was withered, sapless, and utterly dead.