Sapphic


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Sap·phic

 (săf′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Greek poet Sappho.
2.
a. Of, relating to, or being a verse characteristic of Sappho, containing 11 syllables and consisting of a trochee, a spondee or trochee, a dactyl, a trochee, and a spondee or trochee.
b. Relating to or being a stanza of three such verses followed by a verse consisting of a dactyl followed by a spondee or trochee.
c. Relating to or being an ode made up of such stanzas.
d. Of, relating to, or being a verse, stanza, or poem in accentual-syllabic meter composed in imitation of Sapphic quantitative verse.
n.
A Sapphic meter, verse, stanza, or ode.

sap·phic

 (săf′ĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to lesbianism.

[After Sappho, known for her homoerotic poetry.]

sap′phism (săf′ĭz′əm) adj.
sap′phist n. & adj.

Sapphic

(ˈsæfɪk)
adj
1. (Poetry) prosody denoting a metre associated with Sappho, consisting generally of a trochaic pentameter line with a dactyl in the third foot
2. (Poetry) of or relating to Sappho or her poetry
3. lesbian
n
(Poetry) prosody a verse, line, or stanza written in the Sapphic form

Sap•phic

(ˈsæf ɪk)

adj.
1. pertaining to Sappho or to certain meters or a form of strophe or stanza used by or named after her.
n.
3. a Sapphic verse.
[1495–1505; < Latin sapphicus < Greek sapphikós=Sapph(ṓ) Sappho + -ikos -ic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Sapphic - a meter used by Sappho and named after her
rhythmic, rhythmical - recurring with measured regularity; "the rhythmic chiming of church bells"- John Galsworthy; "rhythmical prose"
2.sapphic - of or relating to or characterized by homosexual relations between woman
homosexual - sexually attracted to members of your own sex
Translations

sapphic

[ˈsæfɪk] ADJ (= lesbian) → sáfico

Sapphic

adjsapphisch
References in periodicals archive ?
Writhing with sapphic desire, this exquisitely told tale is ripe with erotic literature, punishment, and torture.
Among them are structuring and interpreting queer spaces of London, bigot geography: queering geopolitics in Brixton, Claude McKay: queering spaces of Black radicalism in interwar London, London's painted poofs and the self-fashioning of Francis Bacon, Sink Street: the Sapphic world of pre-Chinatown Soho, and chasing community from Old Compton Street to the online world of Grindr.
Already portrayed onscreen by Greta Garbo and Liv Ullmann, Sweden's 17th-century "virgin queen" Christina becomes a mercurial tomboy with marked Sapphic tendencies in "The Girl King." Finnish veteran Mika Kaurismaki's English-language multinational co-production won Malin Buska the best actress nod at Montreal, also capturing the audience award for best feature.
The Sexuality of History: Modernity and the Sapphic, 1565-1830
Verlaine's "Ballad Sappho," which appeared in 1889, provides the ending point for her discussion of a key period in literary history that she refers to as the "tremplin" for the fin-de-siecle sapphic fictions that would follow.
4 and 12) Alan gets a surprise visit from Charlie's daughter, Jenny (Amber Tamblyn), in the Season 11 premiere, and it's clear this hard-partying, sapphic 25-year-old takes after her old man.
Over to sapphic Sophie, who spotted Mr Ku Klux Klan and squealed: "There's our local racist!" Not to be outdone, psycho David Platt yelled: "He walks like a racist and talks like a racist." How do you walk like a racist?
"I told my producer that I'd do some research this weekend, so I'm looking around for lesbians, but I'm not having much luck" - Actress Tamzin Outhwaite, who plays 'a sapphic character' in a new production.
Having a wonderful childhood made it much more painful and difficult to become an artist" Film director Terry Gilliam "I told my producer that I'd do some research this weekend, so I'm looking around for lesbians, but I'm not having much luck" Actress Tamzin Outhwaite, above, who plays "a sapphic character" in a new production "English cricket is in crisis.
Eileen Gray and the design of Sapphic modernity; staying in.
And there's even a wonderfully Sapphic scene from Sarah Anne Curzon's The Sweet Girl Graduate, published in 1882.
Pivotal scenes, including the stalker's seduction of her victim's beau in the dark, have been ripped off virtually frame for frame and any Sapphic undertones in the original have been made explicit in the most crude fashion for the target teenage audience.