sartor


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sartor

(ˈsɑːtə)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a humorous or literary word for tailor
[C17: from Latin: a patcher, from sarcīre to patch]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sartor - a person whose occupation is making and altering garmentssartor - a person whose occupation is making and altering garments
fitter - someone who fits a garment to a particular person
garment worker, garmentmaker, garment-worker - a person who makes garments
References in classic literature ?
In a book called Sartor Resartus which Carlyle wrote later, and which here and there was called forth by a memory of his own life, he says:
Still the days passed not all in gloom, Thomas writing a wonderful book, Sartor Resartus, and Jane using all her cleverness to make the home beautiful and comfortable.
When Sartor was finished Carlyle took it to London, but could find no one willing to publish it.
He afterward looked on this experience as a spiritual new birth, and describes it under assumed names at the end of the great chapter in 'Sartor Resartus' on 'The Everlasting No.'
Here Carlyle also wrote the first of his chief works, 'Sartor Resartus,' for which, in 1833-4, he finally secured publication, in 'Fraser's Magazine,' to the astonishment and indignation of most of the readers.
It will probably now be evident that the mainspring of the undeniable and volcanic power of 'Sartor Resartus' (and the same is true of Carlyle's other chief works) is a tremendous moral conviction and fervor.
They knew all about "Snow Bound" and "Sartor Resartus"; but the American editors of 1899 did not want such truck.
"Sunshine before Sunrise!" There's a novelty in that, for poetic use at least, so far as we know, though we remember one fine paragraph about it in Sartor Resartus.
"You'll have to give him a course in 'Sartor Resartus,'" Sheldon laughed, as he came down and began to make friends with Satan.
He never went to Exeter Hall, or heard a popular preacher, or read Tracts for the Times or Sartor Resartus.
She had never read Sartor Resartus, but she had a womanly instinct that clothes possess an influence more powerful over many than the worth of character or the magic of manners.
She overhauled my outfit for me, and meantime I read for the first time 'Sartor Resartus' and Burnaby's 'Ride to Khiva.' I didn't understand much of the first then; but I remember I preferred the soldier to the philosopher at the time; a preference which life has only confirmed.