sartorius

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Related to sartorius muscles: gracilis muscles, gastrocnemius muscles

sar·to·ri·us

 (sär-tôr′ē-əs)
n. pl. sar·to·ri·i (-tôr′ē-ī)
A flat narrow thigh muscle, the longest of the human anatomy, crossing the front of the thigh obliquely from the hip to the inner side of the tibia.

[New Latin, from Late Latin sartor, tailor (from its producing the cross-legged position of a tailor at work), from sartus, past participle of sarcīre, to mend.]

sartorius

(sɑːˈtɔːrɪəs)
n, pl -torii (-ˈtɔːrɪˌaɪ)
(Anatomy) anatomy a long ribbon-shaped muscle that aids in flexing the knee
[C18: New Latin, from sartorius musculus, literally: tailor's muscle, because it is used when one sits in the cross-legged position in which tailors traditionally sat while sewing]

sar•to•ri•us

(sɑrˈtɔr i əs, -ˈtoʊr-)

n., pl. -to•ri•i (-ˈtɔr iˌaɪ, -ˈtoʊr-)
a long, flat, narrow muscle extending obliquely from the front of the hip to the inner side of the tibia.
[1695–1705; < New Latin sartōrius]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sartorius - a muscle in the thigh that helps to rotate the leg into the sitting position assumed by a tailorsartorius - a muscle in the thigh that helps to rotate the leg into the sitting position assumed by a tailor; the longest muscle in the human body
skeletal muscle, striated muscle - a muscle that is connected at either or both ends to a bone and so move parts of the skeleton; a muscle that is characterized by transverse stripes
References in periodicals archive ?
Better known for working on the core, a plank actually is a full-body workout that targets the upper body (pectoral and serratus muscles), lower body (quadriceps and sartorius muscles), and abdominal (rectus abdominis and transverse abdominis that form your outer and inner abdominal muscles) area.
Although the biarticulate rectus femoris and sartorius muscles are critically important during the sit-to-stand transition and during stepping and walking [5-6], they have undesirable actions for standing [4,7], such as thigh flexion.