satrapal

satrapal

(ˈsætrəpəl)
adj
relating to a satrap or satrapy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Mairs shapes her argument around three textual dossiers--the late Achaemenid and early Hellenistic Aramaic documents, probably from the satrapal archive at Bactra; Greek receipt ostraca from Ai' Khanoum's treasury; and a couple of Greek parchments from the late third- and second-century Graeco-Bactrian kingdom--that together demonstrate a bureaucratic organization resembling that of other Achaemenid satrapies or Hellenistic kingdoms.
At the same time, a mostly implicit, in places explicit, periodization undergirds Mairs' arguments: The book proposes two key historical moments, first, the creation of Achaemenid satrapal Bactria, when for the first time the region was incorporated into a stable pan-Near Eastern imperial system of rule, and, second, the satrapy's emancipation from Seleucid rule and emergence as an autonomous regional kingdom.
(10) In historical terms we know that Artaxerxes carefully protected himself against the growing satrapal power, but Chariton presents the quarrels of the Great King and his rebellious satraps as motivated by Callirhoe, unconsciously the pawn of Aphrodite (Cal.
In regard to pallakia, Chariton was no doubt following the likes of Herodotus (1.135) who noted that "Every [Persian] has a number of wives, a much greater number of concubines," which was an image still being presented in Chariton's own day (perhaps) by Strabo (15.3.17): "They marry many wives and also maintain a number of concubines for the sake of having many children." While this Greek scenario of empire-wide polygyny should not be taken at face value, it may well be representative of the elite of Persian society in the Achaemenid (and later Parthian) period, since Persian nobles, and certainly satraps, imitated polygynous customs of royalty and, as a mirror image of the royal court, they housed numerous concubines within the satrapal palaces.
Alexander then launched a purge of those who could share the blame for failing to get adequate supplies to the army, and a purge of satrapal and army officers whom he could accuse of disloyalty or incompetence.
Alexander's modernization included improvements to the existing form of satrapal government, control and exploitation of the sea (p.
Moreover, amid all the differences, some general rules may be determined, such as: profound changes in the satrapal system under Antiochus III (p.
Deniz Kaptan ("From Xenophon to Kristoboulos: Notes on Daskyleion and the Satrapal Court") first compares the site of Daskyleion to its description in Xenophon's works, and then discusses the archaeological evidence for a satrapal court in terms of architecture (for which there is little published information), themes of the memorials (e.g., stelae) as well as the seals of the elite, and the contents of tombs.
In the only dated Greek document from the period before Ptolemy accepted the royal title, his name and satrapal years are also included next to the regnal year of king Alexander IV (see T.
If Darius ordered the temple to be restored, he may very well have authorized the expenditures from the satrapal revenues.
This suggests that it was not paid for out of the local resources of the Jewish community, but out of satrapal or imperial funds.
By 364, internal conflict arose among members of the satrapal family of Dascylium, resulting in the dismemberment of their territory by local freebooters, rebels, and bandits; according to Weiskopf, Greek preoccupation with intrigue and treachery distorted the conflict (pp.