satyr


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sa·tyr

 (sā′tər, săt′ər)
n.
1. often Satyr Greek Mythology A woodland creature depicted as having the pointed ears, legs, and short horns of a goat and a fondness for unrestrained revelry.
2. A licentious man; a lecher.
3. A man who is affected by satyriasis.
4. Any of various satyrid butterflies having brownish wings marked with eyespots.

[Middle English satire, from Old French, from Latin satyrus, from Greek saturos.]

sa·tyr′ic (sā-tîr′ĭk, sə-), sa·tyr′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

satyr

(ˈsætə)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth one of a class of sylvan deities, represented as goatlike men who drank and danced in the train of Dionysus and chased the nymphs
2. a man who has strong sexual desires
3. (Psychiatry) a man who has satyriasis
4. (Animals) any of various butterflies of the genus Satyrus and related genera, having dark wings often marked with eyespots: family Satyridae
[C14: from Latin satyrus, from Greek saturos]
satyric, saˈtyrical adj
ˈsatyr-ˌlike adj

sa•tyr

(ˈseɪ tər, ˈsæt ər)

n.
1. one of a class of ancient Greek woodland deities, represented as part human and part horse or goat, and noted for their riotousness and lasciviousness.
2. a lascivious man; lecher.
3. a man who has satyriasis.
4. Also, sa•tyr•id (ˈseɪ tər ɪd, ˈsæt ər-, səˈtaɪ rɪd) any of several butterflies of the family Satyridae, having gray or brown wings marked with eyespots.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin satyrus < Greek sátyros]
sa•tyr•ic (səˈtɪr ɪk) sa•tyr′i•cal, adj.
sa′tyr•like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.satyr - man with strong sexual desiressatyr - man with strong sexual desires  
degenerate, deviant, deviate, pervert - a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behavior
2.satyr - one of a class of woodland deitiessatyr - one of a class of woodland deities; attendant on Bacchus; identified with Roman fauns
Greek deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Greeks

satyr

noun
An immoral or licentious man:
Informal: dirty old man.
Slang: lech.
Translations

satyr

[ˈsætəʳ] Nsátiro m

satyr

[ˈsætər] n (in mythology)satyre m

satyr

nSatyr m

satyr

[ˈsætəʳ] n (liter) → satiro
References in classic literature ?
As he was roaming about, a Satyr came up to him, and finding that he had lost his way, promised to give him a lodging for the night, and guide him out of the forest in the morning.
It was a slow smile, starting and sometimes ending in the eyes; it was very sensual, neither cruel nor kindly, but suggested rather the inhuman glee of the satyr.
Kutuzov no one spoke of, except some who abused him in whispers, calling him a court weathercock and an old satyr.
In the foreground were box-bordered walks, smooth, sleek lawns, and formal beds of gorgeous flowering plants, while here and there marble statues of wood nymph and satyr gleamed, sparkling in the brilliant sunlight, or, half shaded by an overhanging bush, took on a semblance of life from the riotous play of light and shadow as the leaves above them moved to and fro in the faint breeze.
Then there came the old blankness, and he saw nothing but what seemed to him the face of a satyr - dark and evil - mocking him through the shadows which had surely fallen now for ever.
You perceive, however, that he is neither a lamb, nor a goat, nor a satyr, neither has he much resemblance to the Pan of the Arcadians.
Have we not seen, or by relation heard, In courts and regal chambers how thou lurk'st, In wood or grove, by mossy fountain-side, In valley or green meadow, to waylay Some beauty rare, Calisto, Clymene, Daphne, or Semele, Antiopa, Or Amymone, Syrinx, many more Too long--then lay'st thy scapes on names adored, Apollo, Neptune, Jupiter, or Pan, Satyr, or Faun, or Silvan?
Let anti-masques not be long; they have been commonly of fools, satyrs, baboons, wild-men, antics, beasts, sprites, witches, Ethiops, pigmies, turquets, nymphs, rustics, Cupids, statuas moving, and the like.
the daughters of Hecaterus) were born the divine mountain Nymphs and the tribe of worthless, helpless Satyrs, and the divine Curetes, sportive dancers.
But here in her direst need Una found new friends in a troupe of fauns and satyrs who were playing in the forest.
It contained one of the precious stockings; and half opening it, I revealed to Sylvia's astonished eyes the cunning little frieze of Bacchus and Ariadne, followed by a troop of Satyrs and Bacchantes, which the artist had designed to encircle one of the white columns of that little marble temple which sat before me.
In this way, and in sighing and calling on the fauns and satyrs of the woods and the nymphs of the streams, and Echo, moist and mournful, to answer, console, and hear him, as well as in looking for herbs to sustain him, he passed his time until Sancho's return; and had that been delayed three weeks, as it was three days, the Knight of the Rueful Countenance would have worn such an altered countenance that the mother that bore him would not have known him: and here it will be well to leave him, wrapped up in sighs and verses, to relate how Sancho Panza fared on his mission.