satyr play


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satyr play

n
(Theatre) (in ancient Greek drama) a ribald play with a chorus of satyrs, presented at the Dionysian festival
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sa′tyr play`


n.
(in ancient Greece) a burlesque or ribald drama having a chorus portraying satyrs.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.satyr play - an ancient Greek burlesque with a chorus of satyrssatyr play - an ancient Greek burlesque with a chorus of satyrs
drama, dramatic play, play - a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage; "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Greek Old Comedy, in late-fifth-century BC Athens, used parody and other means to engage tragedy, the satyr play, and contemporary lyric in order to enhance the status of the genre as the preeminent discourse on Athenian art, politics, and society, argues Sells.
New Year's Eve Bash at Night People A standard but stellar line-up takes brings in 2019 at Night People, including quickly rising indie boppers Satyr Play, the energetic and enthralling Naked Six, and the sleepy yet engaging waves of Octopus.
In contrast, Gianni Schicchi is a light hearted satyr play played out around the death-bed of a rich man.
e perfect antidote to the doom ridden La Vida Breve, Gianni Schicchi is a light-hearted satyr play played out around the death-bed of a rich man.
His analysis of key dialogues supports his claim that Plato employed and sought to transform the classical theatrical genres of tragedy, comedy, and satyr play.
The five early speeches and that of Socrates, including his account of Diotima, are considered as a trilogy in the tradition of Greek tragedy with the arrival of Alcibiades as the concluding satyr play. The third introduction compares Plato's Symposium with that of Xenophon and with Plato's Phaedrus.
In the second chapter, the author studies the satyr play Cyclops by Euripides that dramatizes the Homeric episodes and reconstructs the oral myths in literature through an allusive practice that is a part of the hermeneutic skill in critical exercise: The Cyclops is a very striking instance of how later writers appropriate, and often, as in this case, literally 're-write' their predecessors by bringing out the modern structures which can be found there; as is well known, Euripides reads Homer in the light of some of the political and ethical interests of late fifth-century Athens ...
The classical myths are transformed by means of demythologizing devices and burlesque conventions of the Greek satyr play and the Menippean satire.
Byatt who describes the work as 'the satyr play that accompanied the tragedy [of Death in Venice]--the comic and parodic tale of a jeune homme moyen sensual, caught up in the dance of death'.
His pragmatic, expeditious strategies for insuring that his (and his companions') needs are met stand in explicit contrast to the aggressively gluttonous attitudes of the suitors in the Odyssey, the grim cannibalism threatened by the mourning Achilles in the Il iad, or the gleefully profligate ingestion of the Cyclops in Euripides' satyr play.
Aeschylus also wrote a satyr play with comic elements which was performed with the tragedies, but this has been lost.