satyr

(redirected from satyr-like)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

satyr

one of a class of Greek woodland gods with a goat’s or horse’s ears and tail and budding horns; a lustful or sensual man; lecher
Not to be confused with:
satire – the use of ridicule, irony, sarcasm, etc., to expose folly or vice or to lampoon someone; burlesque, caricature, parody
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

sa·tyr

 (sā′tər, săt′ər)
n.
1. often Satyr Greek Mythology A woodland creature depicted as having the pointed ears, legs, and short horns of a goat and a fondness for unrestrained revelry.
2. A licentious man; a lecher.
3. A man who is affected by satyriasis.
4. Any of various satyrid butterflies having brownish wings marked with eyespots.

[Middle English satire, from Old French, from Latin satyrus, from Greek saturos.]

sa·tyr′ic (sā-tîr′ĭk, sə-), sa·tyr′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

satyr

(ˈsætə)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth one of a class of sylvan deities, represented as goatlike men who drank and danced in the train of Dionysus and chased the nymphs
2. a man who has strong sexual desires
3. (Psychiatry) a man who has satyriasis
4. (Animals) any of various butterflies of the genus Satyrus and related genera, having dark wings often marked with eyespots: family Satyridae
[C14: from Latin satyrus, from Greek saturos]
satyric, saˈtyrical adj
ˈsatyr-ˌlike adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sa•tyr

(ˈseɪ tər, ˈsæt ər)

n.
1. one of a class of ancient Greek woodland deities, represented as part human and part horse or goat, and noted for their riotousness and lasciviousness.
2. a lascivious man; lecher.
3. a man who has satyriasis.
4. Also, sa•tyr•id (ˈseɪ tər ɪd, ˈsæt ər-, səˈtaɪ rɪd) any of several butterflies of the family Satyridae, having gray or brown wings marked with eyespots.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin satyrus < Greek sátyros]
sa•tyr•ic (səˈtɪr ɪk) sa•tyr′i•cal, adj.
sa′tyr•like`, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.satyr - man with strong sexual desiressatyr - man with strong sexual desires  
degenerate, deviant, deviate, pervert - a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behavior
2.satyr - one of a class of woodland deitiessatyr - one of a class of woodland deities; attendant on Bacchus; identified with Roman fauns
Greek deity - a deity worshipped by the ancient Greeks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

satyr

noun
An immoral or licentious man:
Informal: dirty old man.
Slang: lech.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

satyr

[ˈsætəʳ] Nsátiro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

satyr

[ˈsætər] n (in mythology)satyre m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

satyr

nSatyr m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

satyr

[ˈsætəʳ] n (liter) → satiro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Then came the silvery-hairy-man, who was also the Sayer of the Law, M'ling, and a satyr-like creature of ape and goat.
Almost nothing is overt in "The Window." The piano tuner (played by the wonderfully satyr-like Roberto Rovira) provides a soundtrack of fractured notes as the women bustle and the lord of the manor reflects.