saucy


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sauc·y

 (sô′sē)
adj. sauc·i·er, sauc·i·est
1. Impertinent or disrespectful, especially in a playful or lively way: a saucy servant; a saucy smile.
2. Attractive or stylish, especially in being sexually alluring: a saucy dress.
3. Having the consistency of or covered with sauce: saucy meatballs.

sau′ci·ly adv.
sau′ci·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

saucy

(ˈsɔːsɪ)
adj, saucier or sauciest
1. impertinent
2. pert; jaunty: a saucy hat.
ˈsaucily adv
ˈsauciness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sau•cy

(ˈsɔ si)

adj. -ci•er, -ci•est.
1. impertinent; insolent.
2. pert; jaunty: a saucy little hat.
[1500–10]
sau′ci•ly, adv.
sau′ci•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.saucy - characterized by a lightly pert and exuberant quality; "a certain irreverent gaiety and ease of manner"
spirited - displaying animation, vigor, or liveliness
2.saucy - improperly forward or bold; "don't be fresh with me"; "impertinent of a child to lecture a grownup"; "an impudent boy given to insulting strangers"; "Don't get wise with me!"
forward - used of temperament or behavior; lacking restraint or modesty; "a forward child badly in need of discipline"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

saucy

adjective impudent, cheeky (informal), impertinent, forward, fresh (informal), flip (informal), rude, sassy (U.S. informal), pert, disrespectful, flippant, presumptuous, insolent, lippy (U.S. & Canad. slang), smart-alecky (informal) a saucy joke
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

saucy

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
hubatýoprsklýšťavnatý
frækvovet
räväkkäsähäkkätomeratopakka
ósvífinn
papuľnatý

saucy

[ˈsɔːsɪ] ADJ (saucier (compar) (sauciest (superl)))
1. (= cheeky) [person] → fresco, descarado
don't be saucy!¡qué fresco!
2. (esp Brit) [joke, humour, postcard, photo] → picante; [clothes] → provocativo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

saucy

[ˈsɔːsi] adj (= cheeky) → impertinent(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

saucy

adj (+er)
(= cheeky)frech; don’t be saucy!sei nicht so frech!
(= suggestive) joke, humouranzüglich, schlüpfrig; picture, clothesgewagt, aufreizend; with her hat at a saucy anglemit frech or keck aufgesetztem Hut
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

saucy

[ˈsɔːsɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (impertinent) → sfacciato/a, impertinente; (look) → provocante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sauce

(soːs) noun
a usually thick liquid that is poured over other food in order to add moisture and flavour. tomato sauce; an expert at making sauces.
ˈsaucy adjective
slightly rude. a saucy remark.
ˈsaucily adverb
ˈsauciness noun
ˈsaucepan (-pən) , ((American) -pan) noun
a deep pan usually with a long handle for boiling or stewing food.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
His fishing-boat was called The Saucy Sally--a cutter-rigged sloop."
"Ay," quoth Little John, "had I but mine own good staff here, it would pleasure me hugely to crack thy knave's pate, thou saucy braggart!
Again, a young girl, more bold and saucy than was fitting, brushed the priest's black robe, singing in his face the sardonic ditty, "niche, niche, the devil is caught." Sometimes a group of squalid old crones, squatting in a file under the shadow of the steps to a porch, scolded noisily as the archdeacon and the bellringer passed, and tossed them this encouraging welcome, with a curse: "Hum!
you are below my anger; and it is beneath me to give ill words to such an audacious saucy trollop; but, hussy, I must tell you, your breeding shows the meanness of your birth as well as of your education; and both very properly qualify you to be the mean serving-woman of a country girl."--"Don't abuse my lady," cries Honour: "I won't take that of you; she's as much better than yours as she is younger, and ten thousand times more handsomer."
"Not while I have a stout stick to thwack your saucy bones!" cried Robin.
"That's the Saucy Jane," Job Rowsell indicated, stretching out a forefinger.
His peevish reproofs wakened in her a naughty delight to provoke him: she was never so happy as when we were all scolding her at once, and she defying us with her bold, saucy look, and her ready words; turning Joseph's religious curses into ridicule, baiting me, and doing just what her father hated most - showing how her pretended insolence, which he thought real, had more power over Heathcliff than his kindness: how the boy would do HER bidding in anything, and HIS only when it suited his own inclination.
What sweets are we going to have?" Natasha again cried boldly, with saucy gaiety, confident that her prank would be taken in good part.
It was one member who said to him that Saucy Sarah would win the Derby and another who said that Saucy Sarah had no chance, but it was William who agreed with both.
"Pshaw, I must be writing to those dear saucy brats every night, whether I will or no, let me have what business I will, or come home ever so late, or be ever so sleepy; but an old saying and a true one,
The mistress of the house was moved with compassion, and inclined to have let me go, and had almost persuaded her husband to it also, but the saucy wenches were run, even before they were sent, and had fetched a constable, and then the master said he could not go back, I must go before a justice, and answered his wife that he might come into trouble himself if he should let me go.
Jo had grown quite her own saucy self again since Teddy came home.