saulge


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saulge

(sɔːdʒ)
n
(Plants) an obsolete word for sage21
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So it was that we drove on to picturesque Saulges, with its 11th Century Church of St Peter and famous Rochefort and Margot caves in the wooded limestone valley below.
So it was that we drove on to picturesque Saulges, with its 11thcentury Church of St Peter, and its famous Rochefort and Margot caves in the wooded limestone valley below.
We took the high-speed ferry from Portsmouth to Cherbourg, then a leisurely three-hour drive to Saulges, a beautiful, sleepy village where every available windowsill was adorned with geraniums and patch of soil immaculately tended.
Apart from the hotel, Saulges doesn't have much going on - two churches, one bar tabac that closed at about 8.30pm on a Saturday night, and a rustic restaurant a 15-minute walk from the centre.
Accommodation at three comfortable hotels in Mezangers, Saulges and Loue.
The journey down there is not bad; we took the three-hour high speed ferry crossing from Portsmouth to Cherbourg, from where it was a leisurely three-hour drive to Saulges, a beautiful, sleepy village where every available windowsill was adorned with geraniums and every patch of soil immaculately tended.
Apart from the hotel itself, Saulges doesn't have much going on - two churches, one bar tabac that closed at about half eight on a Saturday night and a rustic restaurant a 15-minute walk from the centre, which is more your steak, chips and salad fare, rather than the gastronomic gymnastics back at the hotel.
The journey down there is not bad; we took the three-hour high speed ferry crossing from Portsmouth to Cherbourg, from where it was a leisurely threehour drive to Saulges, a beautiful, sleepy village where every available windowsill was adorned with geraniums and every patch of soil immaculately tended.
Head for the centre and the regular farmer's market, which Above: Musee Robert Tatin, left, and the caves of Grottes de Saulges, centre and right runs from around 6am to lunchtime; trestle tables packed with fruit and vegetables, local cider, fish, cheeses - take a cool bag with you if you plan to buy any to take home, which is highly recommended.
The next stop on our fabulous trip was the Hotel l'Ermitage in Saulges, a little village with prehistorical caves.