saved


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Related to saved: Saved by the Bell

save 1

 (sāv)
v. saved, sav·ing, saves
v.tr.
1.
a. To rescue from harm, danger, or loss: The lifeguard saved the struggling swimmer.
b. To prevent from dying: The doctors saved the patient.
c. To set free from the consequences of sin; redeem: prayed to save his soul.
2. To keep in a safe or healthy condition: God save King Richard!
3.
a. To hold back for future use: saved his best song for the encore.
b. To avoid spending (money) so as to keep or accumulate it.
c. To avoid spending (money or time) in an amount less than what circumstances normally require: saved $25 at the sale; saved 15 minutes by taking a shortcut.
d. To prevent the waste or loss of; conserve: bought an efficient device that saves electricity.
e. To treat with care by avoiding fatigue, wear, or damage; spare: wore sunglasses to save his eyesight.
4.
a. To make unnecessary; obviate: By carrying two bags you can save an extra trip.
b. To spare (someone) from having to do something.
5.
a. Sports To prevent (a goal) from being scored by blocking a shot. Used of a goalie.
b. To prevent an opponent from scoring (a point).
c. To preserve a victory in (a game).
d. Baseball To preserve (another pitcher's win) by protecting one's team's lead during a stint of relief pitching.
6. Computers To copy (a file) from a computer's main memory to a disk or other storage medium.
v.intr.
1. To avoid waste or expense; economize.
2. To accumulate money: saving for a vacation.
3. To preserve a person or thing from harm or loss.
n.
1. Sports An act that prevents a ball or puck from entering a goal.
2. Baseball A preservation by a relief pitcher of another pitcher's win.
Idiom:
save (one's) breath
To refrain from a futile appeal or effort: Save your breath; you can't dissuade them.

[Middle English saven, from Old French sauver, from Late Latin salvāre, from Latin salvus, safe; see sol- in Indo-European roots.]

sav′a·ble, save′a·ble adj.
sav′er n.
Synonyms: save1, rescue, reclaim, redeem, deliver
These verbs mean freeing a person or thing from danger, evil, confinement, or servitude. Save is the most general: The smallpox vaccine has saved many lives. A police officer saved the tourist from being cheated. Rescue usually implies saving from immediate harm or danger by direct action: rescue a rare manuscript from a fire. Reclaim can mean to bring a person back, as from error to virtue or to right or proper conduct: "To reclaim me from this course of life was the sole cause of his journey to London" (Henry Fielding).
To redeem is to free someone from captivity or the consequences of sin or error; the term can imply the expenditure of money or effort: The amount paid to redeem the captured duke was enormous. Deliver applies to liberating people from something such as captivity, misery, or peril: "consigned to a state of wretchedness from which no human efforts will deliver them" (George Washington).

save 2

 (sāv)
prep.
With the exception of; except: "No man enjoys self-reproach save a masochist" (Philip Wylie).
conj.
1. Were it not; except: The house would be finished by now, save that we had difficulty contracting a roofer.
2. Unless.

[Middle English, from Old French sauf, from Latin salvō, ablative sing. of salvus, safe; see sol- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.saved - rescued; especially from the power and consequences of sin; "a saved soul"
blessed, blest - highly favored or fortunate (as e.g. by divine grace); "our blessed land"; "the blessed assurance of a steady income"
found - come upon unexpectedly or after searching; "found art"; "the lost-and-found department"
regenerate - reformed spiritually or morally; "a regenerate sinner"; "regenerate by redemption from error or decay"
lost - spiritually or physically doomed or destroyed; "lost souls"; "a lost generation"; "a lost ship"; "the lost platoon"
2.saved - guarded from injury or destruction
preserved - kept intact or in a particular condition
Translations
References in classic literature ?
With what Meg called `a great want of manners' Jo had saved some bonbons for the little girls, and they soon subsided, after hearing the most thrilling events of the evening.
It was the young thing inside him that saved the old man.
That plotter Waddington, or some of his tools, dropped a bomb where it might have done us some injury, but Professor Bumper, who was a fellow passenger, on his way to South America to look for the lost city of Pelone, calmly picked up the bomb, plucked out the fuse, and saved us from bad injuries, if not death.
After that Dude and I went twice a week to the post-office, six miles east of us, and I saved the men a good deal of time by riding on errands to our neighbours.
They saved her from starvation, as Madame Lebrun's table was utterly impossible; and no one save so impertinent a woman as Madame Lebrun could think of offering such food to people and requiring them to pay for it.
They had recently seen a chosen army from that country, which, reverencing as a mother, they had blindly believed invincible--an army led by a chief who had been selected from a crowd of trained warriors, for his rare military endowments, disgracefully routed by a handful of French and Indians, and only saved from annihilation by the coolness and spirit of a Virginian boy, whose riper fame has since diffused itself, with the steady influence of moral truth, to the uttermost confines of Christendom.
Thus Providence, by the means of this Negro, saved the whole of the poor family from destruction.
Even thus early had the child saved her from Satan's snare.
What saved me, as I now see, was that it turned to something else altogether.
I looked at the grand and glorious fellow, but saw no one to be saved.
Nor have there been wanting learned exegetists who have opined that the whale mentioned in the book of Jonah merely meant a life-preserver --an inflated bag of wind --which the endangered prophet swam to, and so was saved from a watery doom.
Master said, God had given men reason, by which they could find out things for themselves; but he had given animals knowledge which did not depend on reason, and which was much more prompt and perfect in its way, and by which they had often saved the lives of men.