sawfly


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saw·fly

 (sô′flī′)
n.
Any of numerous hymenopteran insects of the suborder Symphyta, the females of which have sawlike ovipositors used for cutting into plant tissue to deposit their eggs, and the plant-feeding larvae of which sometimes damage crops and trees.

sawfly

(ˈsɔːˌflaɪ)
n, pl -flies
(Animals) any of various hymenopterous insects of the family Tenthredinidae and related families, the females of which have a sawlike ovipositor

saw•fly

(ˈsɔˌflaɪ)

n., pl. -flies.
any of numerous insects of the family Tenthredinidae, the female of which has a sawlike ovipositor for inserting the eggs in the tissues of a host plant.
[1765–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sawfly - insect whose female has a saw-like ovipositor for inserting eggs into the leaf or stem tissue of a host plantsawfly - insect whose female has a saw-like ovipositor for inserting eggs into the leaf or stem tissue of a host plant
hymenopter, hymenopteran, hymenopteron, hymenopterous insect - insects having two pairs of membranous wings and an ovipositor specialized for stinging or piercing
birch leaf miner, Fenusa pusilla - small black sawfly native to Europe but established in eastern United States; larvae mine the leaves of birches causing serious defoliation
References in periodicals archive ?
INSPECT gooseberries for sawfly, remove if found and prune current season's growth back to five leaves.
JOBS FOR THE WEEK | INSPECT gooseberries for sawfly, remove if found and prune current season's growth back to five leaves.
The pine sawfly class (diprion) is one of the major classes of insect pests of pine forests in the world and is mainly active in Europe, North America, Japan, and China (1).
The conifer sawfly, Neodiprion huizeensis Xiao & Zhou, 1998, belongs to the genus Neodiprion of Diprionidae (Hymenoptera: Symphyta).
pallitarsis (Burnett & Heinze 2014), these cells are maintained in bundles in the seminal vesicle in the mature male as reported for sawfly wasps (Schiff et al.
Mrs C Hudson, Newcastle CAROL: They are probably larvae of the rose sawfly.
Using host records, we have analyzed use patterns of caterpillar and sawfly species on native and non-native woody plants common to suburban landscapes in the southeastern United States.
Following extensive user trials and meeting stringent performance requirements, Revision s Sawfly Eyewear was selected as the all-purpose ballistic spectacle of choice.
The host plant, herbivorous insect, and fungus in my study were pinyon pine, the pinyon pine sawfly Neodiprion edulicolus, and a species of needle rust fungus in the genus Coleosporium.
Beginning in January 2014, Revision will supply as many as 290,000 Sawfly Military Eyewear kits, plus additional accessories.