sawyer


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saw·yer

 (sô′yər)
n.
1. One that is employed in sawing wood.
2. Any of several long-horned beetles of the genus Monochamus having larvae that bore holes in weakened or dead conifers or in lumber.
3. A tree or a part of a tree that bobs in a river or other body of water, causing a danger to navigation.

[Middle English sauere, sawier, from sawen, to saw, from sawe, saw; see saw1.]

sawyer

(ˈsɔːjə)
n
(Forestry) a person who saws timber for a living
[C14 sawier, from saw1 + -ier, variant of -er1]

saw•yer

(ˈsɔ yər, ˈsɔɪ ər)

n.
1. a person who saws wood, esp. as an occupation.
2. any of several long-horned beetles, esp. one of the genus Monochamus, the larvae of which bore in the wood of coniferous trees.
[1300–50; Middle English sawier=sawe saw1 + -ier -ier1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sawyer - one who is employed to saw woodsawyer - one who is employed to saw wood  
laborer, labourer, manual laborer, jack - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor
2.sawyer - any of several beetles whose larvae bore holes in dead or dying trees especially coniferssawyer - any of several beetles whose larvae bore holes in dead or dying trees especially conifers
long-horned beetle, longicorn, longicorn beetle - long-bodied beetle having very long antennae
genus Monochamus, Monochamus - sawyer beetles
pine sawyer - large beetle whose larvae bore holes in pine trees
Translations

sawyer

[ˈsɔːjəʳ] Naserrador m

sawyer

nSägewerker(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
Pickwick bowed to Bob Sawyer, and Bob Sawyer bowed to Mr.
Bob Sawyer, who was habited in a coarse, blue coat, which, without being either a greatcoat or a surtout, partook of the nature and qualities of both, had about him that sort of slovenly smartness, and swaggering gait, which is peculiar to young gentlemen who smoke in the streets by day, shout and scream in the same by night, call waiters by their Christian names, and do various other acts and deeds of an equally facetious description.
Bob Sawyer slightly nodded his assent to the proposition, and asked Mr.
They had been called the Sawyer girls when Miranda at eighteen, Jane at twelve, and Aurelia at eight participated in the various activities of village life; and when Riverboro fell into a habit of thought or speech, it saw no reason for falling out of it, at any rate in the same century.
Yes," sighed his mother, "there it is again; if the twins could 'a' married Aurelia Sawyer, 't would 'a' been all right.
Aurelia's share of the modest Sawyer property had been put into one thing after another by the handsome and luckless Lorenzo de Medici.
But Tom Sawyer he hunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and I might join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable.
I asked her if she reckoned Tom Sawyer would go there, and she said not by a considerable sight.
At that moment a shadow fell on the page and Tom Sawyer stepped in at the door and caught a glimpse of the picture.
Tom Sawyer, you are just as mean as you can be, to sneak up on a person and look at what they're looking at.
WELL, it was the next spring after me and Tom Sawyer set our old nigger Jim free, the time he was chained up for a runaway slave down there on Tom's uncle Silas's farm in Arkansaw.
Well, me and Tom Sawyer had the spring fever, and had it bad, too; but it warn't any use to think about Tom trying to get away, because, as he said, his Aunt Polly wouldn't let him quit school and go traipsing off somers wasting time; so we was pretty blue.