scabbard

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scab·bard

 (skăb′ərd)
n.
A sheath, as for a dagger, sword, or rifle.
tr.v. scab·bard·ed, scab·bard·ing, scab·bards
To put into or furnish with such a sheath.

[Middle English scauberc, scabbard, from Old French escauberc, possibly of Germanic origin; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scabbard

(ˈskæbəd)
n
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a holder for a bladed weapon such as a sword or bayonet; sheath
[C13 scauberc, from Norman French escaubers (pl), of Germanic origin; related to Old High German skār blade and bergan to protect]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

scab•bard

(ˈskæb ərd)

n.
1. a sheath for a sword or the like.
v.t.
2. to put into a scabbard; sheathe.
[1250–1300; Middle English scalburde, scauberge « dissimilated variant of Old High German *skārberga sword-protection.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scabbard - a sheath for a sword or dagger or bayonetscabbard - a sheath for a sword or dagger or bayonet
sheath - a protective covering (as for a knife or sword)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
غِمْد، قِراب
pochva
skede
غلافقرابنیام
huotratuppi
hüvely
slíîur
vagina
maksts
nožnica
baljaskida
kılıç kınıkın
bao kiếmvỏ

scabbard

[ˈskæbəd] Nvaina f, funda f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

scabbard

[ˈskæbərd] nfourreau m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

scabbard

nScheide f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

scabbard

[ˈskæbəd] nfodero
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

scabbard

(ˈskӕbəd) noun
a case in which the blade of a sword is kept.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
in good time, though, to his great delight, the three salt-sea warriors would rise and depart; to his credulous, fable-mongering ears, all their martial bones jingling in them at every step, like Moorish scimetars in scabbards. But, though these barbarians dined in the cabin, and nominally lived there; still, being anything but sedentary in their habits, they were scarcely ever in it except at meal-times, and just before sleeping-time, when they passed through it to their own peculiar quarters.
The three horsemen made no reply, stopped not, and all that was heard was the noise of swords drawn from the scabbards and the cocking of the pistols with which the two phantoms were armed.
Fifty swords flashed from fifty scabbards as the men of the party saw the hostile appearance of their visitors, but before a blow could be struck Norman of Torn, grasping his sword in his right hand, raised his left aloft in a gesture for silence.
They thronged the narrow length of our schooner's decks with their ornamented and barbarous crowd, with the variegated colours of checkered sarongs, red turbans, white jackets, embroideries; with the gleam of scabbards, gold rings, charms, armlets, lance blades, and jewelled handles of their weapons.
Behind him came a throng of officers, whose steel scabbards clattered against the stones as they hastened down the court-yard.
The man with the candle now nodded, and the fourth man--he who had urged Grossmith to leave the wagon--produced from the pocket of his overcoat two long, murderous- looking bowie-knives, which he drew now from their leather scabbards.
Gahan laid his hand upon the hilt of his sword and drew it slowly from its scabbard that he might make no noise that would apprise the creature of his presence.
He stayed his hand on the silver hilt of his sword, and thrust it back into the scabbard as Minerva bade him.
The scraping of the scabbard against its holder as I withdrew it sounded like the filing of cast iron with a great rasp, and I looked to see the room immediately filled with alarmed and attacking guardsmen.
Don Quixote took windmills for giants, and sheep for armies; D'Artagnan took every smile for an insult, and every look as a provocation--whence it resulted that from Tarbes to Meung his fist was constantly doubled, or his hand on the hilt of his sword; and yet the fist did not descend upon any jaw, nor did the sword issue from its scabbard. It was not that the sight of the wretched pony did not excite numerous smiles on the countenances of passers-by; but as against the side of this pony rattled a sword of respectable length, and as over this sword gleamed an eye rather ferocious than haughty, these passers-by repressed their hilarity, or if hilarity prevailed over prudence, they endeavored to laugh only on one side, like the masks of the ancients.
Gay was he, indeed, as Robin had said, and a fine figure he cut, for his doublet was of scarlet silk and his stockings also; a handsome sword hung by his side, the embossed leathern scabbard being picked out with fine threads of gold; his cap was of scarlet velvet, and a broad feather hung down behind and back of one ear.
Well, said the damsel, go ye into yonder barge and row your- self to the sword, and take it and the scabbard with you, and I will ask my gift when I see my time.