scabious


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Related to scabious: field scabious

sca·bi·ous 1

 (skā′bē-əs, skăb′ē-)
adj.
1. Of or relating to scabies.
2. Having scabs.

[From Latin scabiōsus, mangy; see scabiosa.]

sca·bi·ous 2

 (skā′bē-əs)
n.
Any of various plants chiefly of the genus Scabiosa, especially S. atropurpurea, having opposite leaves and variously colored rounded flower heads. Also called scabiosa.

[Middle English scabiose, from Medieval Latin (herba) scabiōsa, (herb) for scabies, scabious; see scabiosa.]

scabious

(ˈskeɪbɪəs)
adj
1. (Pathology) having or covered with scabs
2. (Pathology) of, relating to, or resembling scabies
[C17: from Latin scabiōsus, from scabies]

scabious

(ˈskeɪbɪəs)
n
1. (Plants) any plant of the genus Scabiosa, esp S. atropurpurea, of the Mediterranean region, having blue, red, or whitish dome-shaped flower heads: family Dipsacaceae
2. (Plants) any of various similar plants of the related genus Knautia
3. (Plants) devil's bit scabious a similar and related Eurasian marsh plant, Succisa pratensis
[C14: from Medieval Latin scabiōsa herba the scabies plant, referring to its use in treating scabies]

sca•bi•ous1

(ˈskeɪ bi əs)

adj.
1. scabby.
2. pertaining to or of the nature of scabies.
[1595–1605]

sca•bi•ous2

(ˈskeɪ bi əs)

n.
any of various plants belonging to the genus Scabiosa, having opposite leaves and often showy flower heads in a variety of colors.
[1350–1400; < Medieval Latin scabiōsa (herba) scabies-curing (herb)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scabious - any of various plants of the genus Scabiosascabious - any of various plants of the genus Scabiosa
flower - a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
genus Scabiosa - annual or perennial herbs or subshrubs; mainly Mediterranean
mournful widow, pincushion flower, Scabiosa atropurpurea, sweet scabious - Old World annual having fragrant purple to deep crimson flower heads; naturalized in United States
field scabious, Scabiosa arvensis - perennial having bluish-lilac flowers; introduced in the eastern United States
Translations

scabious

1 [ˈskeɪbɪəs] ADJ (Med) → sarnoso

scabious

2 [ˈskeɪbɪəs] N (Bot) → escabiosa f

scabious

adj (= having scabies)räudig

scabious

[ˈskeɪbɪəs] n (Bot) field scabiousscabiosa
References in periodicals archive ?
The moth's caterpillar feeds on devil's-bit scabious.
Our own cut flower beds are a riot of colour at the moment, overflowing with dahlias, scabious, sunflowers, cosmos, gladioli and a host of other floral delights.
Devil's Bit Scabious Mark Lane, Gardeners' World presenter, suggests Devil's Bit Scabious for an easy grow with high impact.
Pelargonium (geranium), ferns, Fuchsia and Scabiosa (scabious) are all good examples.
The smoothing cream-like gel also reduces uneven texture and has seven other plant extracts - organic aquatic mint, celosia, baccharis, scabious, horse chestnut, sunflower phospholipids and hazelnut oil - to help fight lumps and bumps.
"The knock-on effects are chilling: for example the marsh fritillary butterfly feeds almost exclusively on Devil's-bit scabious, a plant that cannot survive in nitrogen-rich soil."
Smallscale, you could go for scabious, wallflowers and sea-pink, as well as asters in the summer, but avoid cottage garden favourites such as foxgloves, which they can't easily access.
With further help from the Eden Project and Highways England, swathes of devils-bit scabious the main food plant for the marsh fritillary caterpillars have been grown and planted alongside the A30 road corridor.
Another good choice is scented, pincushion-like heads of scabious to attract tortoiseshell, common blue, skippers and holly blue butterflies.
As I messed about with my camera trying to take pictures of the meadow flowers - yellow rattle, marigolds and Devil's-bit scabious - I caught sight of a woolly back...
Meadow brown butterflies bask on a fence in the late evening sun, alongside a pasture full of purple Devil's-bit Scabious. A classic swathe of chalk downland sweeps up abruptly in front of me.
"As I went into Hexham something led me to Waitrose - a shop I've not been to before - and there on the flower display were two buckets of scabious, a delicate blue flower which was just right.