scaffold

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scaf·fold

 (skăf′əld, -ōld′)
n.
1. A temporary platform, either supported from below or suspended from above, on which workers sit or stand when performing tasks at heights above the ground.
2. A raised wooden framework or platform.
3. A platform used in the execution of condemned prisoners, as by hanging or beheading.
tr.v. scaf·fold·ed, scaf·fold·ing, scaf·folds
1. To provide or support with a raised framework or platform.
2. To place on a raised framework or platform.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin scaffaldus, of Old French origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scaffold

(ˈskæfəld; -fəʊld)
n
1. (Building) a temporary metal or wooden framework that is used to support workmen and materials during the erection, repair, etc, of a building or other construction
2. a raised wooden platform on which plays are performed, tobacco, etc, is dried, or (esp formerly) criminals are executed
vb (tr)
3. to provide with a scaffold
4. to support by means of a scaffold
[C14: from Old French eschaffaut, from Vulgar Latin catafalicum (unattested); see catafalque]
ˈscaffolder n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

scaf•fold

(ˈskæf əld, -oʊld)

n.
1. a platform or framework for raising workers and materials during the erection, repair, or maintenance of a building or the like.
2. an elevated platform on which a criminal is executed, usu. by hanging.
3. any raised platform or stage.
4. any supporting framework.
v.t.
5. to furnish with a scaffold or scaffolding.
6. to support by or place on a scaffold.
[1300–50; Middle English scaffot, skaffaut, scaffalde < Old French escadafaut; akin to catafalque]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

scaffold


Past participle: scaffolded
Gerund: scaffolding

Imperative
scaffold
scaffold
Present
I scaffold
you scaffold
he/she/it scaffolds
we scaffold
you scaffold
they scaffold
Preterite
I scaffolded
you scaffolded
he/she/it scaffolded
we scaffolded
you scaffolded
they scaffolded
Present Continuous
I am scaffolding
you are scaffolding
he/she/it is scaffolding
we are scaffolding
you are scaffolding
they are scaffolding
Present Perfect
I have scaffolded
you have scaffolded
he/she/it has scaffolded
we have scaffolded
you have scaffolded
they have scaffolded
Past Continuous
I was scaffolding
you were scaffolding
he/she/it was scaffolding
we were scaffolding
you were scaffolding
they were scaffolding
Past Perfect
I had scaffolded
you had scaffolded
he/she/it had scaffolded
we had scaffolded
you had scaffolded
they had scaffolded
Future
I will scaffold
you will scaffold
he/she/it will scaffold
we will scaffold
you will scaffold
they will scaffold
Future Perfect
I will have scaffolded
you will have scaffolded
he/she/it will have scaffolded
we will have scaffolded
you will have scaffolded
they will have scaffolded
Future Continuous
I will be scaffolding
you will be scaffolding
he/she/it will be scaffolding
we will be scaffolding
you will be scaffolding
they will be scaffolding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scaffolding
you have been scaffolding
he/she/it has been scaffolding
we have been scaffolding
you have been scaffolding
they have been scaffolding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scaffolding
you will have been scaffolding
he/she/it will have been scaffolding
we will have been scaffolding
you will have been scaffolding
they will have been scaffolding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scaffolding
you had been scaffolding
he/she/it had been scaffolding
we had been scaffolding
you had been scaffolding
they had been scaffolding
Conditional
I would scaffold
you would scaffold
he/she/it would scaffold
we would scaffold
you would scaffold
they would scaffold
Past Conditional
I would have scaffolded
you would have scaffolded
he/she/it would have scaffolded
we would have scaffolded
you would have scaffolded
they would have scaffolded
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scaffold - a platform from which criminals are executed (hanged or beheaded)scaffold - a platform from which criminals are executed (hanged or beheaded)
instrument of execution - an instrument designed and used to take the life of a condemned person
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"
2.scaffold - a temporary arrangement erected around a building for convenience of workers
scaffolding, staging - a system of scaffolds
arrangement - an orderly grouping (of things or persons) considered as a unit; the result of arranging; "a flower arrangement"
Verb1.scaffold - provide with a scaffold for support; "scaffold the building before painting it"
hold up, support, sustain, hold - be the physical support of; carry the weight of; "The beam holds up the roof"; "He supported me with one hand while I balanced on the beam"; "What's holding that mirror?"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

scaffold

noun gallows, block, gibbet He ascended the shaky ladder to the scaffold.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

scaffold

noun
A temporary framework with a floor, used by workmen:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مِنَصَّة الإعْدام
popravní lešení
skafot
vesztõhely
vinnu-/aftökupallur
ešafotaspastoliai
ešafotssastatnes
lešenie na popravu

scaffold

[ˈskæfəld] N
1. (Constr) (also scaffolding) → andamio m, andamiaje m
2. (for execution) → patíbulo m, cadalso m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

scaffold

[ˈskæfəld] néchafaud m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

scaffold

n (on building) → Gerüst nt; (for execution) → Schafott nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

scaffold

[ˈskæfld] n (Constr) → impalcatura, ponteggio; (for execution) → patibolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

scaffold

(ˈskӕfəld) noun
a raised platform especially for use formerly when putting a criminal etc to death.
ˈscaffolding noun
an erection of metal poles and wooden planks used by men at work on (the outside of) a building.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Preparations were making on every side; chairs were placed, scaffolds were raised, and windows were hung with flags.
Others of the men were busied erecting scaffolds, and other contrivances, for jerking or drying meat; others were lighting great fires for the same purpose; soon the hunters began to make their appearance, bringing in the choicest morsels of buffalo meat; these were placed upon the scaffolds, and the whole camp presented a scene of singular hurry and activity.
Workmen in aprons, standing on scaffolds, were laying bricks, pouring mortar out of vats, and smoothing it with trowels.
Meagre, indeed, and cold, was the sympathy that a transgressor might look for, from such bystanders, at the scaffold. On the other hand, a penalty which, in our days, would infer a degree of mocking infamy and ridicule, might then be invested with almost as stern a dignity as the punishment of death itself.
Well, these boards you hear unloaded are the posts and planks to build my scaffold. Some workmen must have fallen underneath them and been hurt."
And now, the sun's first beams came glancing into the street; and the night's work, which, in its various stages and in the varied fancies of the lookers-on had taken a hundred shapes, wore its own proper form--a scaffold, and a gibbet.
There we sat, on our tall scaffold, the butt of the hate and mockery of all those enemies.
I am Charles II., son of Charles Stuart, who reigned in England, and died on the scaffold."
This man had once been brought to the scaffold in company with several others, and had had the sentence of death by shooting passed upon him for some political crime.
A supplementary clause was tacked to the sentence, to the effect that "the aforesaid Cornelius van Baerle should be led from the prison of the Buytenhof to the scaffold in the yard of the same name, where the public executioner would cut off his head."
As it came on very dark, he began to think of all the men he had known who had died upon the scaffold; some of them through his means.
The palmer whispered to them, as though offering last words of consolation; and the three men, with arms bound tightly behind their backs, ascended the scaffold, followed by their confessor.