scalar


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sca·lar

 (skā′lər, -lär′)
n.
1.
a. A quantity, such as mass, length, or speed, that is completely specified by its magnitude and has no direction.
b. Mathematics A number, numerical quantity, or element in a field.
2. A device that yields an output equal to the input multiplied by a constant, as in a linear amplifier.
adj.
Of or relating to a scalar.

[Latin scālāris, of a ladder, from scālae, ladder; see scale2.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scalar

(ˈskeɪlə)
n
1. (Mathematics) a quantity, such as time or temperature, that has magnitude but not direction. Compare vector1, tensor2, pseudoscalar, pseudovector
2. (Mathematics) maths an element of a field associated with a vector space
adj
(Mathematics) having magnitude but not direction
[C17 (meaning: resembling a ladder): from Latin scālāris, from scāla ladder]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sca•lar

(ˈskeɪ lər)

adj.
1. representable by position on a scale or line; having only magnitude: a scalar variable.
2. of, pertaining to, or utilizing a scalar.
3. ladderlike in arrangement or organization; graduated.
n.
4. a quantity possessing only magnitude. Compare vector (def. 1).
[1650–60; < Latin scālāris of a ladder. See scale3, -ar1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

sca·lar

(skā′lər)
A quantity, such as mass, length, or speed, whose only property is magnitude; a number. Compare vector.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scalar - a variable quantity that cannot be resolved into components
variable quantity, variable - a quantity that can assume any of a set of values
Adj.1.scalar - of or relating to a musical scale; "he played some basic scalar patterns on his guitar"
2.scalar - of or relating to a directionless magnitude (such as mass or speed etc.) that is completely specified by its magnitude; "scalar quantity"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

scalar

[ˈskeɪləʳ] (Math, Phys)
1. adjscalare
2. nscalare m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
"We do not know what dark matter is, but if it has anything to do with any scalar particles, it may be older than the Big Bang.
Here, we consider for the first time a broad class of scenarios where a massive free scalar field unavoidably reaches an equilibrium between its classical and quantum dynamics in a characteristic timescale during inflation and sources the DM density," he (https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.123.061302) wrote .&nbsp;
The Scalar report provided management's projection for the group's total revenues to be $32.557 million in the year to 31 December 2019, rising to $65.113 million in 2020, and to $95.288 million by 2021.
CDW (NASDAQ: CDW) has announced its agreement to acquire Scalar Decisions Inc., a technology solutions provider in Canada with locations across the country and trailing 12-month net sales of approximately CUSD 250 million, the company said.
Scalar was founded in 2004 and has almost 350 workers serving customers across Canada.
A spinor that is a scalar. Let us here call this a scalar-bispinor and let us denote it with the symbol f and because of its scalar nature--under a Lorentz transformation, we will have ([phi]' = [phi]).
In addition, the torsion scalar is presented as T = [S.sub.[rho].sup.[mu]v] [K.sub.[mu]v.sub.[rho]] using the super potential [S.sub.[rho].sub.[mu]v] and the contortion tensor [K.sub.[mu]v.sub.[rho]].
Just like in the scalar field case, the ambiguity in the quantization can be seen to lie in the choice of a so-called complex structure in the space of solutions (of the Dirac equation in this case).
First, different well-established scalar IMs are separately investigated, and then they are coupled to form two-parameter vector IMs.
Henceforth, unless specified otherwise, A is supposed to be a scalar type spectral operator in a complex Banach space (X, [parallel]*[parallel]) and [E.sub.A](*) is supposed to be its strongly o-additive spectral measure (the resolution of the identity) assigning to each Borel set [delta] of the complex plane C a projection operator [E.sub.A] ([delta]) on X and having the operator's spectrum [sigma](A) as its support [6, 7].
The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is compared to the scalar companding system based on the G.711 standard [4].
* Cost-effective as a high-dynamic-range scalar network analyzer where phase measurements are not needed