scalene muscle


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Related to scalene muscle: anterior scalene muscle

scalene muscle

n.
Any of three muscles on each side of the neck that originate at the cervical vertebrae and insert into either the first or second ribs, serving to bend and rotate the neck and assist breathing by raising the first and second ribs. Also called scalenus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scalene muscle - any of four pairs of muscles extending from the cervical vertebrae to the second rib; involved in moving the neck and in breathing
skeletal muscle, striated muscle - a muscle that is connected at either or both ends to a bone and so move parts of the skeleton; a muscle that is characterized by transverse stripes
References in periodicals archive ?
Inter scalene block was performed by palpating groove between the anterior scalene and middle scalene muscle [4,5,6] with 23 x 1.5G needle and locating neurovascular bundle by moving the needle anteriorly and posteriorly.
"In that space you have the large scalene muscle of the neck, nerves and arteries--they all get compressed and squashed.
Neither approach eliminates risk of nerve injury as the dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) and the long thoracic nerve (LTN) travel through the middle scalene muscle, while the phrenic nerve may be placed at risk of injury while traversing along the anterior scalene muscle.
The initial ultrasound examination aided in localizing the mass external to the scalene muscle, leading us away from this diagnosis.
The main etiology described for DSN entrapment is hypertrophy of the middle scalene muscle causing compression of the nerve as it passes through.21 Mondelli et al.
Extension into the spinal canal on the left was noted from C6/7 to the bottom of the T1 level without cord compression, along with abnormal bone marrow signal intensity involving the posteromedial first rib and left anterior scalene muscle, all again consistent with leukemic infiltration.
Anatomic predispositions (cervical ribs, abnormal first ribs, alterations of the costoclavicular ligaments, anomalies of the scalene muscle, or insertion of the pectoralis minor) and extrinsic factors like trauma or chronic repetitive movements may result in TOS [6, 7].
Upon exiting their respective neural foramina, the roots travel in the interscalene space, bounded anteriorly by the anterior scalene muscle, posteriorly by the middle/posterior scalene muscles, and inferiorly by the subclavian artery/first rib.
Operative treatment for PSS includes first rib resection, scalene muscle removal, or subclavius muscle removal, along with removal of constricting scar tissue from around the vein.
Soft-tissue abnormalities include scalene muscle abnormalities and fibrous bands.
The lesion is situated posterolateral to right sternocleidomastoid muscle, lateral to right carotid and jugular vessel and right scalene muscle anterior to right trapezius muscle and posterosuperior to clavicle and subclavian vessel suggestive of possible lymphangioma.