scalene

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Related to scalenes: splenius, Longus colli
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scalene
scalene triangles

sca·lene

 (skā′lēn′, skā-lēn′)
adj.
Having three unequal sides. Used of triangles.

[Late Latin scalēnus, from Greek skalēnos, from skallein, to hoe, stir up; see skel- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scalene

(ˈskeɪliːn)
adj
1. (Mathematics) maths (of a triangle) having all sides of unequal length
2. (Anatomy) anatomy of or relating to any of the scalenus muscles
[C17: from Late Latin scalēnus with unequal sides, from Greek skalēnos]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sca•lene

(skeɪˈlin)

adj.
a. (of a cone or the like) having the axis inclined to the base.
b. (of a triangle) having three unequal sides.
[1635–45; < Late Latin scalēnus < Greek skalēnós unequal]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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scalene

sca·lene

(skā′lēn′)
Having three unequal sides, as a triangle that is neither equilateral nor isosceles.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.scalene - of a triangle having three sides of different lengths
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
2.scalene - of or relating to any of the scalene muscles
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

scalene

adj triangleungleichseitig; coneschief
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

scalene

[ˈskeɪliːn] adj (Geom) scalene triangletriangolo scaleno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
(13-14) In the inferior neck at the level of the anterior and middle scalenes, the C8 and T1 nerve roots form the inferior (lower) trunk and then each trunk of the brachial plexus divides into the anterior and posterior divisions as the plexus passes through the cervico-axillary canal posterior to the clavicle.
Deep palpation of the anterior and middle scalenes, as well as, left cervical rotation and cervical extension recreated the pain along the medial border of the scapula.
For example, physical stressors can produce mechanical stresses on posture by tightening muscles in the jaw, such as masseter and temporalis, and the tension triangle in the neck region involving muscles such as trapezius, levator scapula, scalenes, and sternocleidomastoid.
Lateral neck muscles, in particular the scalenes, were equally tense, restricting optimal blood flow to and from the head/ eyes.
(1) Right Scalene/ In order to stretch the right scalenes and (2) Sternocleidomastoid sternocleidomastoid, the patient was Stretch instructed to sit upright in a chair and to use a sheet (1) or the left hand (2) to hold the right shoulder down.
Ligaments: Longitudinal ligaments, transverse ligament of the atlas Muscles: Sternocleidomastoid, scalenes, splenius capitis, longissimus capitis, semispinalis capitis Mechanism of Neck Injuries Axial Compression: Usually occur when the cervical spine is in forward flexion but may occur at any position when a blow is delivered to the top of the skull.
The soft-tissues treated included the cervical paraspinals, scalenes, upper trapezius, and levator scapulae muscles, bilaterally.
Strengthening the serratus anterior as a protractor in place of the pectoralis musculature; 3- Strengthening the deep cervical flexors in place of the SCM and scalenes (this is often obtained by making sure that the chin is somewhat tucked when performing flexion); 4.
Both Adson's test (in which the seated patient's radial pulse was palpated on the involved side and the anterior and middle scalenes were tested for involvement by extending the arm with slight external rotation and abduction while the patient's head was rotated towards the involved side with slight lateral flexion and extension, looking for a diminished radial pulse or reproduction of symptoms) and Eden's test (a.k.a.