scalic


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Related to scalic: gapped scale
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Adj.1.scalic - of or related to a musical scale; "scalic patterns"
References in periodicals archive ?
In his very elegant, uncomplicated style, he plays with subtle cross-rhythms being passed between different string groups, whilst they ascend, playing scalic patterns.
Not unnoticed was woodwind wizardry during speedy scalic passages and some ultra-dynamic percussion playing.
(66) Mrs Russell's gapped minor tune (no sixth), imposing and striking, stands in marked contrast to Will Haines's rather plodding, scalic major tune which reiterates the tonic note in every bar but one.
Approaching intervals from the standpoint of scalic relationships is a more sound method.
Eighth and sixteenth notes flow gently into a dual cadenza of scalic patterns, with the pianist given a moment to shine as a soloist at the end.
In this case, the booklet note tells us the percussion "forms the core of various layers of sound, which move across one another in part according to the chance rhythms of aleatory principles, and whose scalic material partly derives from Slavonic liturgical chant and partly from serial note-row procedures." It's the kind of stuff that delights composers and music critics and is generally ignored by the public.
By the finale, however, the players were once again comfortable with the Arnold's lively melodies and scalic passages
These exercises were performed both with acoustic guitar accompaniment by the music therapist for harmonic support and without accompaniment to encourage Tracey to concentrate on the use of solfege hand signs used in scalic passages.
But in one respect the earliest surviving Byzantine theory seems very undeveloped, and that is in its scalic structure.
He replaced this with a mournful Largo setting of a text of similar affection, 'S'io dir potessi' (HG 70), but - evidently at Cuzzoni's insistence - he was finally forced to reject these reflective settings in favour of his fast and fiery second setting of 'S'or mi dai pene'.(64) This is characterized by syncopated rhythms and torrents of scalic and arpeggiated figurations.
The Elizabethan words that come next, `and shall be covered again with my skin', were set by Morley to music that very effectively illustrates the idea of `covering' by the overlapping entries of the four voices, and that by imitation between the vocal parts of a little smoothly contoured scalic figure even suggests the restoration of the sensuous, rounded, unbroken surface of human flesh.
When scalic clusters build up, note by instrument, the textures alter.