scallop


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Related to scallop: scollop

scal·lop

(skŏl′əp, skăl′-) also scol·lop (skŏl′-)
n.
1.
a. Any of various marine bivalve mollusks of the family Pectinidae, having fan-shaped shells with a radiating fluted pattern.
b. The edible adductor muscle of a scallop.
c. A shell of a scallop, or a dish in a similar shape, used for baking and serving seafood.
2. One of a series of curved projections forming an ornamental border.
3. See escalope.
v. scal·loped, scal·lop·ing, scal·lops also scol·loped or scol·lop·ing or scol·lops
v.tr.
1. To edge (cloth, for example) with a series of curved projections.
2. To bake in a casserole with milk or a sauce and often with bread crumbs: scalloped potatoes.
3. To cut (meat) into thin boneless slices.
v.intr.
To gather scallops for eating or sale.

[Middle English scalop, from Old French escalope, shell, perhaps of Germanic origin (akin to Dutch schelp, seashell), or from Old French escale, scale; see scale1 + Old French (envel)ope, enveloping cover (from enveloper, to envelop; see envelop).]

scal′lop·er n.

scallop

(ˈskɒləp; ˈskæl-)
n
1. (Animals) any of various marine bivalves of the family Pectinidae, having a fluted fan-shaped shell: includes free-swimming species (genus Pecten) and species attached to a substratum (genus Chlamys). See also pecten3
2. (Zoology) the edible adductor muscle of certain of these molluscs
3. (Zoology) either of the shell valves of any of these molluscs
4. (Cookery) a scallop shell or similarly shaped dish, in which fish, esp shellfish, is cooked and served
5. one of a series of curves along an edge, esp an edge of cloth
6. (Historical Terms) the shape of a scallop shell used as the badge of a pilgrim, esp in the Middle Ages
7. (Cookery) chiefly Austral a potato cake fried in batter
vb
8. (tr) to decorate (an edge) with scallops
9. (Cookery) to bake (food) in a scallop shell or similar dish
10. (intr) to collect scallops
[C14: from Old French escalope shell, of Germanic origin; see scalp]
ˈscalloper n
ˈscalloping n

scal•lop

(ˈskɒl əp, ˈskæl-)

n., v. -loped, -lop•ing. n.
1. any usu. ribbed bivalve mollusk of the family Pectinidae that swims by clapping the fluted shell valves together.
2. the adductor muscle of certain species of such mollusks, used as food.
3. one of the shells of such a mollusk, usu. having radial ribs and a wavy outer edge.
4. a scallop shell or scalloplike plate for baking and serving food.
5. a thin slice of meat, esp. veal, flattened by pounding.
6. any of a series of curved projections cut along an edge, as of a fabric.
v.t.
7. to finish (an edge) with scallops.
8. to escallop.
v.i.
9. to dredge for scallops.
[1350–1400; Middle English scalop, aph. variant of escal(l)op < Old French escalope, escalipe shell, perhaps < Middle Dutch scele, scolpe mollusk shell (Dutch schelp)]

scallop


Past participle: scalloped
Gerund: scalloping

Imperative
scallop
scallop
Present
I scallop
you scallop
he/she/it scallops
we scallop
you scallop
they scallop
Preterite
I scalloped
you scalloped
he/she/it scalloped
we scalloped
you scalloped
they scalloped
Present Continuous
I am scalloping
you are scalloping
he/she/it is scalloping
we are scalloping
you are scalloping
they are scalloping
Present Perfect
I have scalloped
you have scalloped
he/she/it has scalloped
we have scalloped
you have scalloped
they have scalloped
Past Continuous
I was scalloping
you were scalloping
he/she/it was scalloping
we were scalloping
you were scalloping
they were scalloping
Past Perfect
I had scalloped
you had scalloped
he/she/it had scalloped
we had scalloped
you had scalloped
they had scalloped
Future
I will scallop
you will scallop
he/she/it will scallop
we will scallop
you will scallop
they will scallop
Future Perfect
I will have scalloped
you will have scalloped
he/she/it will have scalloped
we will have scalloped
you will have scalloped
they will have scalloped
Future Continuous
I will be scalloping
you will be scalloping
he/she/it will be scalloping
we will be scalloping
you will be scalloping
they will be scalloping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scalloping
you have been scalloping
he/she/it has been scalloping
we have been scalloping
you have been scalloping
they have been scalloping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scalloping
you will have been scalloping
he/she/it will have been scalloping
we will have been scalloping
you will have been scalloping
they will have been scalloping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scalloping
you had been scalloping
he/she/it had been scalloping
we had been scalloping
you had been scalloping
they had been scalloping
Conditional
I would scallop
you would scallop
he/she/it would scallop
we would scallop
you would scallop
they would scallop
Past Conditional
I would have scalloped
you would have scalloped
he/she/it would have scalloped
we would have scalloped
you would have scalloped
they would have scalloped

scallop

To alternate solid food with layers of creamy sauce.

Scallop plate

A plate in the shape of a scallop shell. Scalloped oysters, at one time, were prepared in scallop shells. Dishes for scalloped oyster preparation were often shaped like scallop shells. Ornamental dishes unable to withstand the necessary baking temperature are still sometimes made in the shape of scallop shells.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scallop - one of a series of rounded projections (or the notches between them) formed by curves along an edge (as the edge of a leaf or piece of cloth or the margin of a shell or a shriveled red blood cell observed in a hypertonic solution etc.)scallop - one of a series of rounded projections (or the notches between them) formed by curves along an edge (as the edge of a leaf or piece of cloth or the margin of a shell or a shriveled red blood cell observed in a hypertonic solution etc.)
curve, curved shape - the trace of a point whose direction of motion changes
2.scallop - edible muscle of mollusks having fan-shaped shells; served broiled or poached or in salads or cream sauces
escallop, scollop, scallop - edible marine bivalve having a fluted fan-shaped shell that swim by expelling water from the shell in a series of snapping motions
shellfish - meat of edible aquatic invertebrate with a shell (especially a mollusk or crustacean)
sea scallop - muscle of large deep-water scallops
bay scallop - muscle of small choice shallow-water scallops
3.Scallop - thin slice of meat (especially veal) usually fried or broiledscallop - thin slice of meat (especially veal) usually fried or broiled
slice, piece - a serving that has been cut from a larger portion; "a piece of pie"; "a slice of bread"
4.scallop - edible marine bivalve having a fluted fan-shaped shell that swim by expelling water from the shell in a series of snapping motions
bivalve, lamellibranch, pelecypod - marine or freshwater mollusks having a soft body with platelike gills enclosed within two shells hinged together
Pecten irradians, bay scallop - a small scallop inhabiting shallow waters and mud flats of the Atlantic coast of North America
giant scallop, Pecten magellanicus, sea scallop - a large scallop inhabiting deep waters of the Atlantic coast of North America
escallop, scollop, scallop - edible muscle of mollusks having fan-shaped shells; served broiled or poached or in salads or cream sauces
Verb1.scallop - decorate an edge with scallops; "the dress had a scalloped skirt"
adorn, decorate, grace, ornament, embellish, beautify - make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"
2.scallop - bake in a sauce, milk, etc., often with breadcrumbs on top
ready, prepare, cook, fix, make - prepare for eating by applying heat; "Cook me dinner, please"; "can you make me an omelette?"; "fix breakfast for the guests, please"
3.scallop - form scallops in; "scallop the meat"
core out, hollow out, hollow - remove the interior of; "hollow out a tree trunk"
4.scallop - fish for scallops
fish - catch or try to catch fish or shellfish; "I like to go fishing on weekends"
5.scallop - shape or cut in scallops; "scallop the hem of the dress"
shape, form - give shape or form to; "shape the dough"; "form the young child's character"
Translations
الأسْقَلوب: مَحار مَرْوَحي الشَّكْلمَحَارُ الاسقلوب
hřebenatkalastura
kammusling
vieiraconcha de peregrinovenera
kampasimpukkasimpukka
jakobova kapica
fésûkagyló
hörpudiskurhörpuskel
ホタテガイ帆立貝
가리비국자가리비
šukutėsgeldutė
ķemmes gliemene
escalopePectinidae
hrebenatka
kammusslamusslapilgrimsmussla
หอยพัด
con điệp

scallop

[ˈskɒləp]
A. N
1. (Zool) → venera f
2. (Sew) → festón m, onda f
B. VT
1. (Culin) → guisar en conchas
2. (Sew) → festonear
C. CPD scallop shell Nvenera f

scallop

[ˈskæləp ˈskɒləp] n
(to eat)coquille f Saint-Jacques

scallop

n
(Zool) → Kammmuschel f, → Jakobsmuschel f (esp Cook); scallop shell (for cooking) → Muschelschale f
(= loop)Bogen m, → bogenförmige Verzierung; (on linenware) → Feston m
vt (= decorate with loops)mit Bögen or mit einem Bogenrand versehen; linenwarefestonieren

scallop

[ˈskɒləp] n
a. (Zool) → pettine m
b. (Culin) → cappa santa
c. (Sewing) → smerlo

scallop

also scollop (ˈskoləp) noun
an edible shellfish that has a pair of hinged, fan-shaped shells.
ˈscalloped adjective
(of the edge of a garment etc) cut into curves and notches. The collar of the blouse has a scalloped edge.

Scallop

مَحَارُ الاسقلوب lastura kammusling Jakobsmuschel αχιβάδα vieira simpukka coquille Saint-Jacques jakobova kapica capasanta ホタテガイ 국자가리비 escalope kamskjell przegrzebek vieira устрица kammussla หอยพัด deniz tarağı con điệp 扇贝
References in classic literature ?
So urgent was Sir Nigel on the shore, and so prompt was Goodwin Hawtayne on the cog, that Sir Oliver Buttesthorn had scarce swallowed his last scallop ere the peal of the trumpet and clang of nakir announced that all was ready and the anchor drawn.
They were like no walrus, sea lion, seal, bear, whale, shark, fish, squid, or scallop that Kotick had ever seen before.
He looked at her hair done up high, with the long white veil and white flowers and the high, stand-up, scalloped collar, that in such a maidenly fashion hid her long neck at the sides and only showed it in front, her strikingly slender figure, and it seemed to him that she looked better than ever--not because these flowers, this veil, this gown from Paris added anything to her beauty; but because, in spite of the elaborate sumptuousness of her attire, the expression of her sweet face, of her eyes, of her lips was still her own characteristic expression of guileless truthfulness.
His broad fins are bored, and scalloped out like a lost sheep's ear!
With an alacrity beyond the common impulse of a spirit which yet was never indifferent to the credit of doing every thing well and attentively, with the real goodwill of a mind delighted with its own ideas, did she then do all the honours of the meal, and help and recommend the minced chicken and scalloped oysters, with an urgency which she knew would be acceptable to the early hours and civil scruples of their guests.
They made a queer picture, indeed; for they wore wide, white collars around their necks and the collars had many scallops and points.
Welland's turn to grow pale as the endless consequences of her blunder unrolled themselves before her; but she managed to laugh, and take a second helping of scalloped oysters, before she said, struggling back into her old armour of cheerfulness: "My dear, how could you imagine such a thing?
In vain she nibbled at the bread and butter and pecked at the crab-apple preserve out of the little scalloped glass dish by her plate.
"All right," said Joe, reaching for the blue scalloped vegetable dish.
"Oh I do feel so ill ALL OVER me, my dear Ribby; I have swallowed a large tin patty-pan with a sharp scalloped edge!"
At last, he took a pencil and pointed out an imperceptible black point in the scallops of an oval blotch, adding: "There it is." She bent over the map; the maze of coloured lines hurt her eyes without enlightening her; and when Bourais asked her what puzzled her, she requested him to show her the house Victor lived in.
"I suppose I 've got to speak to her, so here goes;" and, nerving himself to the task, Tom slowly approached the damsel, who looked as if the wind had blown her clothes into rags, such a flapping of sashes, scallops, ruffles, curls, and feathers was there.