scalloped


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

scal·lop

(skŏl′əp, skăl′-) also scol·lop (skŏl′-)
n.
1.
a. Any of various marine bivalve mollusks of the family Pectinidae, having fan-shaped shells with a radiating fluted pattern.
b. The edible adductor muscle of a scallop.
c. A shell of a scallop, or a dish in a similar shape, used for baking and serving seafood.
2. One of a series of curved projections forming an ornamental border.
3. See escalope.
v. scal·loped, scal·lop·ing, scal·lops also scol·loped or scol·lop·ing or scol·lops
v.tr.
1. To edge (cloth, for example) with a series of curved projections.
2. To bake in a casserole with milk or a sauce and often with bread crumbs: scalloped potatoes.
3. To cut (meat) into thin boneless slices.
v.intr.
To gather scallops for eating or sale.

[Middle English scalop, from Old French escalope, shell, perhaps of Germanic origin (akin to Dutch schelp, seashell), or from Old French escale, scale; see scale1 + Old French (envel)ope, enveloping cover (from enveloper, to envelop; see envelop).]

scal′lop·er n.

scalloped

(ˈskæləpt; ˈskɒləpt)
adj
having an edge shaped like a scallop
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.scalloped - having a margin with rounded scallops
rough - of the margin of a leaf shape; having the edge cut or fringed or scalloped
Translations
ذو حافَّةٍ من النُتوءات المُدَوَّرَه
kroužkovaný
skreyttur meî tungum
zúbkovaný
fistolu

scalloped

[ˈskæləpt ˈskɒləpt] adj [edge, neckline] → festonné(e)

scalloped

adj
mit einem Bogenrand; linenwarefestoniert; scalloped edgeBogen-/Festonrand m
(Cook) → überbacken

scalloped

[ˈskɒləpt] adj (edge) → a smerlo; (neck) → smerlato/a

scallop

also scollop (ˈskoləp) noun
an edible shellfish that has a pair of hinged, fan-shaped shells.
ˈscalloped adjective
(of the edge of a garment etc) cut into curves and notches. The collar of the blouse has a scalloped edge.
References in classic literature ?
He looked at her hair done up high, with the long white veil and white flowers and the high, stand-up, scalloped collar, that in such a maidenly fashion hid her long neck at the sides and only showed it in front, her strikingly slender figure, and it seemed to him that she looked better than ever--not because these flowers, this veil, this gown from Paris added anything to her beauty; but because, in spite of the elaborate sumptuousness of her attire, the expression of her sweet face, of her eyes, of her lips was still her own characteristic expression of guileless truthfulness.
His broad fins are bored, and scalloped out like a lost sheep's ear!
With an alacrity beyond the common impulse of a spirit which yet was never indifferent to the credit of doing every thing well and attentively, with the real goodwill of a mind delighted with its own ideas, did she then do all the honours of the meal, and help and recommend the minced chicken and scalloped oysters, with an urgency which she knew would be acceptable to the early hours and civil scruples of their guests.