scamp


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Related to scamp: casita

scamp 1

 (skămp)
n.
1. A rogue; a rascal.
2. A mischievous youngster.

[Probably from scamp, to go about idly, probably from obsolete Dutch schampen, to decamp, from Middle Dutch ontscampen; see scamper.]

scamp 2

 (skămp)
tr.v. scamped, scamp·ing, scamps
To perform or make in a careless or inadequate way.

[Possibly of Scandinavian origin.]

scamp′er n.

scamp

(skæmp)
n
1. an idle mischievous person; rascal
2. a mischievous child
[C18: from scamp (vb) to be a highway robber, probably from Middle Dutch schampen to decamp, from Old French escamper, from es- ex-1 + -camper, from Latin campus field]
ˈscampish adj

scamp

(skæmp)
vb
a less common word for skimp
ˈscamper n

scamp

(skæmp)

n.
1. an unscrupulous person; rascal.
2. a playful or mischievous young person.
v.t.
3. to do in a hasty, careless manner: to scamp work.
[1775–85; obsolete scamp to travel about idly or for mischief, perhaps < Dutch (now obsolete) schampen to be gone < Old French escamper to decamp]
scamp′ish, adj.

scamp

- Once meant a highwayman; as a verb, it meant "rob on the highway."
See also related terms for highway.

scamp


Past participle: scamped
Gerund: scamping

Imperative
scamp
scamp
Present
I scamp
you scamp
he/she/it scamps
we scamp
you scamp
they scamp
Preterite
I scamped
you scamped
he/she/it scamped
we scamped
you scamped
they scamped
Present Continuous
I am scamping
you are scamping
he/she/it is scamping
we are scamping
you are scamping
they are scamping
Present Perfect
I have scamped
you have scamped
he/she/it has scamped
we have scamped
you have scamped
they have scamped
Past Continuous
I was scamping
you were scamping
he/she/it was scamping
we were scamping
you were scamping
they were scamping
Past Perfect
I had scamped
you had scamped
he/she/it had scamped
we had scamped
you had scamped
they had scamped
Future
I will scamp
you will scamp
he/she/it will scamp
we will scamp
you will scamp
they will scamp
Future Perfect
I will have scamped
you will have scamped
he/she/it will have scamped
we will have scamped
you will have scamped
they will have scamped
Future Continuous
I will be scamping
you will be scamping
he/she/it will be scamping
we will be scamping
you will be scamping
they will be scamping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scamping
you have been scamping
he/she/it has been scamping
we have been scamping
you have been scamping
they have been scamping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scamping
you will have been scamping
he/she/it will have been scamping
we will have been scamping
you will have been scamping
they will have been scamping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scamping
you had been scamping
he/she/it had been scamping
we had been scamping
you had been scamping
they had been scamping
Conditional
I would scamp
you would scamp
he/she/it would scamp
we would scamp
you would scamp
they would scamp
Past Conditional
I would have scamped
you would have scamped
he/she/it would have scamped
we would have scamped
you would have scamped
they would have scamped
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scamp - one who is playfully mischievousscamp - one who is playfully mischievous  
child, kid, minor, nipper, tiddler, youngster, tike, shaver, small fry, nestling, fry, tyke - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
brat, holy terror, little terror, terror - a very troublesome child
Verb1.scamp - perform hastily and carelessly
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
perform, do, execute - carry out or perform an action; "John did the painting, the weeding, and he cleaned out the gutters"; "the skater executed a triple pirouette"; "she did a little dance"

scamp

noun rascal, devil, monkey, rogue, imp, tyke (informal), wretch, knave (archaic), scallywag (informal), pickle (Brit. informal), mischief-maker, whippersnapper, toerag (slang), scapegrace Have some respect for me, you scamp!

scamp

noun
One who causes minor trouble or damage:
Informal: cutup.
Translations

scamp

2 [skæmp] VT [+ one's work etc] → chapucear, frangollar

scamp

[ˈskæmp] n (= rascal) → voyou m

scamp

1
n (inf)Frechdachs m, → Lausebengel m (inf)

scamp

2
vt workpfuschen or schludern (inf)bei

scamp

1 [skæmp] n (fam) (child) → peste f

scamp

2 vt (one's work) → fare in fretta e male
References in classic literature ?
"Oh, you bewitching little scamp, CAN'T you be quiet just a minute or two, and let your poor old uncle attend to a part of his duties?"
After this, forcing a laugh, I said, "And now, you scamp, you wanted to make me believe that a Square may in the same way by motion 'Upward, not Northward' produce another figure, a sort of extra Square in Three Dimensions.
Then tell me; art thou not an arrant, all-grasping, inter-meddling, monopolizing, heathenish old scamp, to be one day making legs, and the next day coffins to clap them in, and yet again life-buoys out of those same coffins?
To think, here I've been, night after night, a -- YOU just get well once, you young scamp, and I lay I'll tan the Old Harry out o' both o' ye!"
And then, in that abominable scamp with his youth already soiled, withered like a plucked flower ready to be flung on some rotting heap of rubbish, no very genuine feeling about anything could exist- not even about the hazards of his own unclean existence.
Even Negrillon, who pretended to have burnt his leg that he might rest from work--he only laughed, and said Negrillon was a great scamp. oh, mamma, I'm so happy; it frightens me."
Are you turning out a scamp? I tell you I won't have it.
He gave me no chance to reason with him, the dirty scamp!"
It wouldn't do, and I had to pay the scamp a hundred.
Appearances are everything, so far as human opinion goes, and the man who will walk down Piccadilly arm in arm with the most notorious scamp in London, provided he is a well-dressed one, will slink up a back street to say a couple of words to a seedy-looking gentleman.
I have even a shrewd suspicion that what with showing the balloon, explaining the plans and views of the doctor, giving folks a glimpse of the latter, through a half-opened window, or pointing him out as he passed along the streets, the clever scamp earned a few half-crowns, but we must not find fault with him for that.
The young scamp is there already!' he exclaimed when he saw his little son in the sledge.