scanning tunneling microscope


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scanning tunneling microscope

n.
A microscope that scans the surface of a sample with a beam of electrons, causing a narrow channel of tunneling electrons to flow between the sample and the beam, and producing three-dimensional images of atomic topography and structure.

scan′ning tun′neling mi`croscope


n.
an electronic microscope that produces images of atomic structures by moving an extremely fine probe over the surface of a material.
Abbr: STM
[1980–85]

scanning tunneling microscope

A microscope used to make images of individual atoms on the surface of a material. The microscope has a probe ending in a tiny sharp tip that moves along the material's surface while emitting a stream of electrons. The flow of electrons is constant so long as the distance between the tip and the material's surface atoms is held constant. An image is formed based on the continual adjustments made to the height of the tip to keep the electron flow constant over the "bumps" that are the atoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lu, "Fully low voltage and large area searching scanning tunneling microscope," Measurement Science and Technology, vol.
With the scanning tunneling microscope, "we can land just on top of one molecule, measure it and spin it," Sykes says.
The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a widely- known and important surface science instrument, its capacity to perform atomic-scale characterization being the cause of this importance.
If optical technology is of interest, visit the scanning tunneling microscope exhibit.
The key part of a scanning tunneling microscope is an extremely sharp needle that rides over the surface being examined.
There are a few tools that have been very influential, and they have really opened up this area--namely, an invention created at IBM Research in Zurich called "the scanning tunneling microscope." A derivative of the scanning tunneling microscope, called "the atomic force microscope," was created in the mid to late eighties.
Thanks to development of the high-resolution, scanning tunneling microscope in 1990, it's now possible to scan an atom, produce a copy and transplant it, or combine it with other atoms.
Scanning tunneling microscope images of adenine and thymine at atomic resolution.
Manipulation of nanoscale objects can be achieved using a scanning probe microscope, such as an AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) or an STM (Scanning Tunneling Microscope).
When researchers were first able to push them around with a device called a Scanning Tunneling Microscope, the experiment was carried out in a vacuum at a temperature approaching absolute zero (-459 degrees Fahrenheit).
(A nanometer is around 40 billionths of an inch--about five atoms placed side by side.) The elliptical corral was created using cobalt atoms precisely placed by a scanning tunneling microscope on a copper surface.

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