scantling

(redirected from scantings)
Related to scantings: scanty, scantily clad, scat, propagating

scant·ling

 (skănt′lĭng, -lĭn)
n.
1. A very small amount; a modicum.
2. A small timber used in construction.
3. The dimensions of a building material, especially the width and thickness of a timber.
4. often scantings Nautical The dimensions of the structural parts of a vessel.

[Alteration of Middle English scantlon, scantilon, carpenter's gauge, from Old French escantillon, alteration of *eschandillon, from Late Latin *scandiculum, alteration of scandāculum, ladder, gauge, from Latin scandere, to climb; see skand- in Indo-European roots.]

scantling

(ˈskæntlɪŋ)
n
1. (Building) a piece of sawn timber, such as a rafter, that has a small cross section
2. (Building) the dimensions of a piece of building material or the structural parts of a ship, esp those in cross section
3. (Building) a building stone, esp one that is more than 6 feet in length
4. a small quantity or amount
[C16: changed (through influence of scant and -ling1) from earlier scantillon, a carpenter's gauge, from Old Norman French escantillon, ultimately from Latin scandere to climb; see scan]

scant•ling

(ˈskænt lɪŋ)

n.
1. a timber of relatively slight width and thickness, as a stud or rafter in a house frame.
2. such timbers collectively.
3. the width and thickness of a timber.
4. a small quantity or amount.
[1520–30; alter., by folk etym., of Middle English scantilon (< Old French escantillon gauge) reinterpreted as derivative of scant]

scantling

- Means "measured or prescribed size" or a "set of standard dimensions."
See also related terms for measured.

Scantling

 a small quantity—Johnson, 1755.
Examples: scantling of apples, 1849; of burgundy, 1765; of eloquence, 1704; of food 1835; of geological knowledge, 1876; of paper, 1743; of time, 1665; of wit, 1680.

Scantling

An odd-shaped piece of lumber used in building construction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scantling - an upright in house framingscantling - an upright in house framing    
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
upright, vertical - a vertical structural member as a post or stake; "the ball sailed between the uprights"
References in periodicals archive ?
Scholar after scholar is taken to task for shameful errors and base scantings of this unlikely Dulcinea.