scantling


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scant·ling

 (skănt′lĭng, -lĭn)
n.
1. A very small amount; a modicum.
2. A small timber used in construction.
3. The dimensions of a building material, especially the width and thickness of a timber.
4. often scantings Nautical The dimensions of the structural parts of a vessel.

[Alteration of Middle English scantlon, scantilon, carpenter's gauge, from Old French escantillon, alteration of *eschandillon, from Late Latin *scandiculum, alteration of scandāculum, ladder, gauge, from Latin scandere, to climb; see skand- in Indo-European roots.]

scantling

(ˈskæntlɪŋ)
n
1. (Building) a piece of sawn timber, such as a rafter, that has a small cross section
2. (Building) the dimensions of a piece of building material or the structural parts of a ship, esp those in cross section
3. (Building) a building stone, esp one that is more than 6 feet in length
4. a small quantity or amount
[C16: changed (through influence of scant and -ling1) from earlier scantillon, a carpenter's gauge, from Old Norman French escantillon, ultimately from Latin scandere to climb; see scan]

scant•ling

(ˈskænt lɪŋ)

n.
1. a timber of relatively slight width and thickness, as a stud or rafter in a house frame.
2. such timbers collectively.
3. the width and thickness of a timber.
4. a small quantity or amount.
[1520–30; alter., by folk etym., of Middle English scantilon (< Old French escantillon gauge) reinterpreted as derivative of scant]

scantling

- Means "measured or prescribed size" or a "set of standard dimensions."
See also related terms for measured.

Scantling

 a small quantity—Johnson, 1755.
Examples: scantling of apples, 1849; of burgundy, 1765; of eloquence, 1704; of food 1835; of geological knowledge, 1876; of paper, 1743; of time, 1665; of wit, 1680.

Scantling

An odd-shaped piece of lumber used in building construction.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scantling - an upright in house framingscantling - an upright in house framing    
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
upright, vertical - a vertical structural member as a post or stake; "the ball sailed between the uprights"
References in classic literature ?
The third are gratiosi, favorites; such as exceed not this scantling, to be solace to the sovereign, and harmless to the people.
Victor, with hammer and nails and scraps of scantling, was patching a corner of one of the galleries.
The boy held the end of the telescope against one of the veranda scantlings, while the man gazed through it at the sea.
About two hundred yards off, in the flat, we built a pen of scantlings, about four feet high, and laid planks on it, and so made a platform.
Tenders are invited for supply of plywood, timber planks, scantling and misc stores for maintenance works in gref centre, pune-15, maharashtra
He dropped from second to third after the final event, when Taiwo moved up two spots with his 1,500 finish in 4:17.35, a time that also knocked Garrett Scantling out of Olympic contention.
These true wood prototype mock-ups utilized a scantling, created from a three-piece lam that provides strength to the system.
Dean Scantling returned from the Korean War, but the pride of serving his country is something he never forgets.