scapegoat

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scape·goat

 (skāp′gōt′)
n.
1. One that is made to bear the blame of others.
2. Bible A live goat over whose head Aaron confessed all the sins of the children of Israel on the Day of Atonement. The goat, symbolically bearing their sins, was then sent into the wilderness.
tr.v. scape·goat·ed, scape·goat·ing, scape·goats
To make a scapegoat of.

[scape + goat (translation of Hebrew 'ēz 'ōzēl, goat that escapes, misreading of 'ăzā'zēl, Azazel).]

scapegoat

(ˈskeɪpˌɡəʊt)
n
1. a person made to bear the blame for others
2. (Bible) Old Testament a goat used in the ritual of Yom Kippur (Leviticus 16); it was symbolically laden with the sins of the Israelites and sent into the wilderness to be destroyed
vb
(tr) to make a scapegoat of
[C16: from escape + goat, coined by William Tyndale to translate Biblical Hebrew azāzēl (probably) goat for Azazel, mistakenly thought to mean 'goat that escapes']

scape•goat

(ˈskeɪpˌgoʊt)

n.
1. a person or group made to bear the blame for others or to suffer in their place.
2. a goat let loose in the wilderness on Yom Kippur after the high priest symbolically laid the sins of the people on its head. Lev. 16:8, 10, 26.
v.t.
3. to make a scapegoat of.
[1530; scape2 + goat, as a translation of Hebrew ‘azāzel]
scape′goat•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scapegoat - someone who is punished for the errors of others
victim - an unfortunate person who suffers from some adverse circumstance

scapegoat

noun
1. fall guy, victim, patsy (informal), whipping boy Her supporters see her as a scapegoat for a policy that failed.
verb
1. blame, hold responsible, accuse, point a or the finger at He has been scapegoated for the lack of jobs and housing problems

scapegoat

noun
One who is made an object of blame:
Slang: fall guy, patsy.
Translations
كَبْش الفِداء، حامِل وِزْر غَيْرِهكبش فداء
obětní beránek
syndebuk
syntipukki
bûnbakbűnbak
kambing hitam
blóraböggull
atpirkimo ožys
grēkāzis
kozioł ofiarny
bode expiatório
obetný baránok
syndabock
günah keçisişamar oğlanı

scapegoat

[ˈskeɪpgəʊt] Ncabeza f de turco, chivo m expiatorio
to be a scapegoat forpagar el pato por, pagar los cristales rotos por

scapegoat

[ˈskeɪpgəʊt] nbouc m émissaire

scapegoat

nSündenbock m; to be a scapegoat for somethingfür etw der Sündenbock sein; to use somebody/something as a scapegoat, to make somebody/something one’s scapegoatjdm/einer Sache die Schuld zuschieben
vtdie Schuld zuschieben (+dat)

scapegoat

[ˈskeɪpˌgəʊt] ncapro espiatorio

scapegoat

(ˈskeipgəut) noun
a person who is blamed or punished for the mistakes of others. The manager of the football team was made a scapegoat for the team's failure, and was forced to resign.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Life in the closet is worse than scapegoating. It is not a closet.
The most notorious instance of scapegoating in Hemingway's work is the vilification of Robert Cohn in The Sun Also Rises; however, a less noted, but more layered and similarly important instance of scapegoating occurs in Across the River and into the Trees.
Girard's theories on mimesis and scapegoating have become important tools for creative theological reflection.
an elaborate theory about the human propensity for scapegoating violence
And so we use myth, art and religion as devices to explain and cope with reality." Thus does English writer Charlie Campbell set the stage for his survey of scapegoating throughout human history, whether it was Adam blaming Eve for the loss of Eden (ignoring the fact that a supposedly all-powerful God set the whole thing up) or Hitler's insane but politically astute blaming of Germany's ills on the Jews.
"Scapegoating is the practice of singling out any party for unmerited negative treatment or blame.
Harvey said that scapegoating "is a leadership behavior called abusive supervision, which includes things like spreading rumors about employees, insulting them, withholding information, and pretty much everything short of actual physical abuse."
The chapters that follow--on selected works by Katherine Anne Porter, Flannery O'Connor, Cormac McCarthy, and Walker Percy-provide new readings to support Ciuba's contention that mimesis, scapegoating, and contagious violence mark the Southern region and that the texts of Southern writers embody the region's harshest critiques.
In Violence and the Sacred (originally published in French in 1972) Rene Girard offered a reading of Oedipus Rex in terms of the communal practice of scapegoating. Ritual Unbound takes this as its starting point for an engagement with modernist fiction.
Cousineau shows that these novels not only work to demystify scapegoating by defending "a solitary protagonist who has become the target of communal violence" (17), but they also, ironically, threaten to remystify sacrifice, often by inviting us to sympathize with first-person narrators who themselves are anxious to shift guilt from themselves and onto others.
Cousineau contends that these narrators, while explicitly condemning certain scapegoating practices, redirect their blame toward other characters, undermining the force of their moralistic judgments with subtle hypocrisy.
Meanwhile, Any Mick'll Do is a classic warning to us all of the danger of scapegoating minorities within society.