scapegrace

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scape·grace

 (skāp′grās′)
n.
A scoundrel; a rascal.

scapegrace

(ˈskeɪpˌɡreɪs)
n
an idle mischievous person
[C19: from scape2 + grace, alluding to a person who lacks God's grace]

scape•grace

(ˈskeɪpˌgreɪs)

n.
a persistent rascal.
[1800–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scapegrace - a reckless and unprincipled reprobatescapegrace - a reckless and unprincipled reprobate
miscreant, reprobate - a person without moral scruples
Translations

scapegrace

(o.f.) [ˈskeɪpgreɪs] Npícaro m, bribón m
References in classic literature ?
Both Kuragin and Dolokhov were at that time notorious among the rakes and scapegraces of Petersburg.
But the lower- fourth was just now an overgrown form, too large for any one man to attend to properly, and consequently the elysium or ideal form of the young scapegraces who formed the staple of it.
"As for Reinaldos," replied Don Quixote, "I venture to say that he was broad-faced, of ruddy complexion, with roguish and somewhat prominent eyes, excessively punctilious and touchy, and given to the society of thieves and scapegraces. With regard to Roland, or Rotolando, or Orlando (for the histories call him by all these names), I am of opinion, and hold, that he was of middle height, broad-shouldered, rather bow-legged, swarthy-complexioned, red-bearded, with a hairy body and a severe expression of countenance, a man of few words, but very polite and well-bred."
Besides the individuals I have mentioned, there belonged to the household three young men, dissipated, good-for-nothing, roystering blades of savages, who were either employed in prosecuting love affairs with the maidens of the tribe, or grew boozy on 'arva' and tobacco in the company of congenial spirits, the scapegraces of the valley.
Get down, you young scapegrace, and let the old man rest his weary limbs." Upon this the old man made his son dismount, and got up himself.
I would not be understood to suppose that the proceedings of the unhappy scapegrace, with his few profligate companions I have here introduced, are a specimen of the common practices of society - the case is an extreme one, as I trusted none would fail to perceive; but I know that such characters do exist, and if I have warned one rash youth from following in their steps, or prevented one thoughtless girl from falling into the very natural error of my heroine, the book has not been written in vain.