scapula


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
click for a larger image
scapula

scap·u·la

 (skăp′yə-lə)
n. pl. scap·u·las or scap·u·lae (-lē′)
Either of two large, flat, triangular bones forming the back part of the shoulder. Also called shoulder blade.

[Late Latin, shoulder, from Latin scapulae, the shoulder blades.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scapula

(ˈskæpjʊlə)
n, pl -lae (-liː) or -las
1. (Anatomy) either of two large flat triangular bones, one on each side of the back part of the shoulder in man. Nontechnical name: shoulder blade
2. (Anatomy) the corresponding bone in most vertebrates
[C16: from Late Latin: shoulder]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

scap•u•la

(ˈskæp yə lə)

n., pl. -las, -lae (-ˌli)
1. either of two flat triangular bones each forming the back part of a shoulder; shoulder blade.
2. a dorsal bone of the pectoral girdle.
[1570–80; < Latin: shoulder]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

scap·u·la

(skăp′yə-lə)
Either of two flat, triangular bones forming part of the shoulder. In humans and other primates, they lie on the upper part of the back on either side of the spine. Also called shoulder blade. See more at skeleton.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scapula

(pl. scapulae) Either of the two shoulder blades.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scapula - either of two flat triangular bones one on each side of the shoulder in human beingsscapula - either of two flat triangular bones one on each side of the shoulder in human beings
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
glenoid cavity, glenoid fossa - the concavity in the head of the scapula that receives the head of the humerus to form the shoulder joint
acromial process, acromion - the outermost point of the spine of the shoulder blade
articulatio humeri, shoulder joint, shoulder - a ball-and-socket joint between the head of the humerus and a cavity of the scapula
endoskeleton - the internal skeleton; bony and cartilaginous structure (especially of vertebrates)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
lapaluu
skapula

scapula

[ˈskæpjʊlə] N (scapulas or scapulae (pl)) [ˈskæpjʊliː]escápula f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

scapula

n (Anat) → Schulterblatt nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

scapula

[ˈskæpjʊlə] n (scapulas or scapulae (pl)) (Med) → scapola
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

scap·u·la

n. escápula, hueso del hombro.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

scapula

n (pl -lae) omóplato or omoplato, escápula
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of scapular winging (i.e., lateral displacement and caudal rotation of the glenoid of the scapula) was assessed with the affected arm at rest and with the patient seated.
From the back side, is there a flare in the right scapula? Does the left hip appear higher than the right?
Radiological investigations demonstrated an expanded lytic lesion in the scapula near the glenoid cavity.
Fresh bovine bones such as femur, tibia, humerus, radius/ ulna (fore arm), metacarpus, metatarsus, scapula, skull, pelvis, rib and backbone were collected from slaughterhouse for present investigations.
Zuckerman (orthopedic surgery, New York U.) and Koval (orthopedics, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, New Hampshire) draw on their nearly 20 years of experience, and help from some colleagues, to describe the evaluation and management of fractures about the shoulder, including the proximal humerus, clavicle, and scapula. They present a systematic approach to evaluating fractures from the simplest to the most complex based on a careful assessment of the fracture factors and patient factors that made each injury unique.
* A scapula fracture is associated with life-threatening injuries and requires an extensive workup.
There, wedged between two old volumes, is the scapula of a caribou.
The purpose of their study was to develop a method to analyze movement of the shoulder blade (scapula) during wheelchair propulsion.
Other sites such as the forehead, face, chest, scapula, lumbosacral spine, buttocks, and scrotum have also been reportedly involved (2-7).
The goal of this study was to develop a technique that may be useful to detect bone geometry and pixel gray value from contour data of CT-scan slice of the scapula. In this paper an attempt has been made to relate quantitative Computed Tomography (CT) gray values with apparent density, and apparent density with elastic modulus.