scar tissue


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scar tissue

n.
Dense fibrous connective tissue that forms over a healed wound or cut.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scar′ tis`sue


n.
connective tissue that has contracted and become dense and fibrous, forming a scar.
[1870–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scar tissue - the connective tissue that forms a scar; consists of fibroblasts in new scars and collagen fibers in old scars
connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
adhesion - a fibrous band of scar tissue that binds together normally separate anatomical structures
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

scar tissue

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers are one step closer to solving the mystery of why some vertebrates can regenerate their spinal cords while others, including humans, create scar tissue after spinal-cord injury (SCI), leading to lifelong damage.
A staph infection creates a large amount of scar tissue that can lead to chronic pain and loss of mobility.
When blood supply to the heart is blocked during a heart attack, cardiac colony-forming unit fibroblasts replace damaged tissue with collagen-based scar tissue. "This is a problem because scarring of heart tissue can reduce the heart's ability to pump blood effectively," lead researcher James J.
When a serious wound is incurred, the biggest obstacle to healing is the generation of scar tissue, which has different properties than normal skin that cause discomfort and can be unsightly.
Scar tissue has the potential to spread in any direction, including internally, throughout the body.
The formation of scar tissue is a common by-product of wound repair, leading to serious clinical dysfunction and aesthetic problems.
Because heart muscle does not regenerate, the damaged areas are replaced with scar tissue, which does not contract.
Because heart muscles do not regenerate, the damaged areas are replaced with scar tissue, which does not contract.
Required stitches: If you needed stitches because you had a tear, these stitches will heal, but sometimes they can leave you with scar tissue at the perineum.
Researchers used mouse models to investigate the impact of 1,25D, a form of vitamin D that interacts with hormones, on the cells that form scar tissue after a heart attack.
However, after an injury to the central nervous system, a special type of scar tissue is formed which inhibits this regeneration.