scarecrow


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scare·crow

 (skâr′krō′)
n.
1. A crude image or effigy of a person set up in a field to scare birds away from growing crops.
2. Something frightening but not dangerous.
3. A gaunt or haggard person.

scarecrow

(ˈskɛəˌkrəʊ)
n
1. an object, usually in the shape of a man, made out of sticks and old clothes to scare birds away from crops
2. a person or thing that appears frightening but is not actually harmful
3. informal
a. an untidy-looking person
b. a very thin person

scare•crow

(ˈskɛərˌkroʊ)

n.
1. an object, usu. a figure of a person in old clothes, set up to frighten crows or other birds away from crops.
2. something frightening but not dangerous.
3. a ragged or extremely thin person.
[1545–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scarecrow - an effigy in the shape of a man to frighten birds away from seedsscarecrow - an effigy in the shape of a man to frighten birds away from seeds
effigy, simulacrum, image - a representation of a person (especially in the form of sculpture); "the coin bears an effigy of Lincoln"; "the emperor's tomb had his image carved in stone"

scarecrow

noun
A person wearing ragged or tattered clothing:
Translations
فَزَّاعَةفَزّاعَه
strašákstrašák do zelí
fugleskræmsel
linnunpelätinvariksenpelätinvariksenpelätti
strašilo
madárijesztő
fuglahræîa
かかし
허수아비
strašilo
strašilo
fågelskrämma
หุ่นไล่กา
bostan korkuluğukorkuluk
bù nhìn

scarecrow

[ˈskɛəkrəʊ] Nespantapájaros m inv, espantajo m

scarecrow

[ˈskɛərkrəʊ] n (to frighten birds)épouvantail m

scarecrow

[ˈskɛəkrəʊ] n (also, fig) → spaventapasseri m inv

scare

(skeə) verb
to startle or frighten. You'll scare the baby if you shout; His warning scared her into obeying him.
noun
1. a feeling of fear or alarm. The noise gave me a scare.
2. a feeling of fear or panic among a large number of people. a smallpox scare.
scared adjective
frightened. I'm scared of spiders; a scared little girl.
ˈscarecrow noun
a figure set up eg in a field, to scare away birds and stop them eating the seeds etc.
ˈscaremonger noun
a person who spreads alarming rumours.
scare away/off
to make go away or stay away because of fear. The birds were scared away by the dog.

scarecrow

فَزَّاعَة strašák do zelí fugleskræmsel Vogelscheuche σκιάχτρο espantapájaros linnunpelätin épouvantail strašilo spaventapasseri かかし 허수아비 vogelverschrikker fugleskremsel strach na wróble espantalho пугало fågelskrämma หุ่นไล่กา korkuluk bù nhìn 草人
References in classic literature ?
I suppose every reader of this book knows what a scarecrow is; but Jack Pumpkinhead, never having seen such a creation, was more surprised at meeting the remarkable King of the Emerald City than by any other one experience of his brief life.
His Majesty the Scarecrow was dressed in a suit of faded blue clothes, and his head was merely a small sack stuffed with straw, upon which eyes, ears, a nose and a mouth had been rudely painted to represent a face.
But if the strange appearance of his Majesty the Scarecrow seemed startling to Jack, no less wonderful was the form of the Pumpkinhead to the Scarecrow.
The Scarecrow is probably the wisest man in all Oz," remarked the Tin Woodman, when they had started upon their journey.
Upon the very top of the structure was perched a figure representing the Scarecrow himself, and upon his extended arms, as well as upon his head, were several crows carved out of ebony and having ruby eyes.
The gardens around the mansion consisted of cornfields, and Dorothy acknowledged that the place was in all respects a very appropriate home for her good friend the Scarecrow.
exclaimed the Shaggy Man; "here comes my friend the Scarecrow.
Just then the famous Scarecrow of Oz came around the bend in the road, riding astride a wooden Sawhorse which was so small that its rider's legs nearly touched the ground.
After a few hours the road began to be rough, and the walking grew so difficult that the Scarecrow often stumbled over the yellow bricks, which were here very uneven.
She offered a piece to the Scarecrow, but he refused.
Following close behind the chariot Dorothy saw her old friend the Scarecrow, riding calmly astride a wooden Saw-Horse, which pranced and trotted as naturally as any meat horse could have done.
Dorothy knew at once it was a magic carpet she beheld, and her heart beat high with hope and joy as she realized she was soon to be rescued and allowed to greet her dearly beloved friends of Oz--the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman and the Cowardly Lion.