scatteration

scatteration

(ˌskætəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. the act of scattering or the state of being scattered
2. the movement of people and industries out of the city
3. the practice of dispersing funds and energies in too many directions or smaller units
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
It hit the pier in the center and went all to smash and scatteration like a box of matches struck by lightning.
Employment decentralisation: Polycentricity or scatteration? The case of Barcelona.
It advocated that the federal government or the individual states create "permanent agricultural reserves" to protect "priceless resource [s]" from "suburban scatteration" which threatened in many areas "to become endless, monotonous megalopolis." (59) This philosophy harkened back to the New Deal, when the federal government purchased over eleven million acres of privately owned, marginally productive land and placed its management in the hands of various federal and state agencies.
underdeveloped sites or agricultural uses." At that time, a more neutral term, "scatteration," was also used to describe this phenomenon.
programs or policies of "scatteration." (200) Such strategies
The Scatteration of Knowledge and the Rise of Metanarrative Doubt
Cette forme urbaine peut etre monocentrique, c'est-a-dire avec une centre-ville fort (modele traditionnel), elle peut etre polycentrique, ou les emplois sont redistribues a, l'interieur de plusieurs poles d'emploi peripheriques, ou subir une dispersion generalisee (scatteration), ou les emplois sont redistribues egalement sur l'ensemble du territoire metropolitain.
Progressive reformers were confident that through the injunction and abatement laws they could fulfill two of their most important goals: destroy segregation and prevent "scatteration." [151] Unlike the Mann Act, red-light abatement worked extremely well.
Now we are indebted to a Catholic philosopher on the faculty of Boston College for a careful yet fresh exposition of the SCG that enables us to appreciate just how much Aquinas deplored "scatteration" in theology.
The world is very wide, the arts are very wide, and they have to take all of those things into consideration--plus the dangers of what used to be called by somebody at the Ford Foundation, "scatteration," which is spreading a little bit here and there until it all adds up to nothing.
His disk with fellow guitar flame-thrower Vernon Reid, Smash and Scatteration, reworks the history of guitar duos from Lonnie Johnson and Eddie Lang on up with barbed, witty intensity.