scelerate

scelerate

(ˈsɛləˌreɪt) or

scelerat

n
a villain, or extremely wicked person; a criminal
adj
characterized by extreme villainy or wickedness
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Ci duole d'aver dovuto intrattenere a lungo i lettori di pazze e scelerate profanazioni, e non vorremmo che ci venisse dato carico di non averle presentate con quel senso di gravita che sarebbe stato conveniente.
Leah Tolbert-Lyons focuses on women's relations to men and motherhood in Traversee; Mireille Sacotte analyzes Leocadie Timothee's subtle but revolutionary attitude toward education; Fabienne Viala studies female cannibalism in La Vie scelerate, Celanire cou-coupe, and La Femme cannibale.
Conde, speaking with Barbara Lewis, states that in writing her historically informed novel La Vie Scelerate, she was trying to write memory, which focuses on the smaller and more banal details in life rather than on official history (549), which she also does in fleshing out her more personal Tituba.
Derriere la fantaisie du modeste repas qui se deroule dans la "caverne scelerate" (1369) de Jeanlin aurait lieu l'esquisse d'un festin totemique.
It is informed by a way of thinking akin to that of Chantal Thomas, who, in La reine scelerate: Marie-Antoinette dans les pamphlets (1989), demonstrates how tracts written about that queen had, and have, lives of their own, their rhetoric needing study apart from how they might correctly or incorrectly inform about their subject.
It is worth remembering, then, that in the 1980s Chantal Thomas was among the first of a small cohort of scholars working on both sides of the Atlantic to analyse through a feminist lens the mythologization of Marie-Antoinette as "queen of vice." Seuil's publication in 1989 of La Reine scelerate, Thomas's lively examination of the extensive defamatory, and often pornographic pamphlet literature directed against the queen, was a trailblazing event in an academic milieu newly intrigued by the workings of gender in politics.
(31) On d'Artois's reputation, see Chantal Thomas, La Reine scelerate: Marie-Antoinette dans les pamphlets (Paris, 1989), 118, 169-73, 187-96.
La vie scelerate (1987), her fifth novel, traces a Guadeloupean bourgeois family through four generations of gain, loss, miscegenation and exile.
She is the author of several novels, including Heremakhonon, Segou: les Murailles de terre, Moi, Tituba, sorciere noire de Salem, La vie scelerate, and Traversee de la mangrove.
In 1986 Conde returned to live in Guadeloupe, where La Vie scelerate (1987; Tree of Life ) is set.