scenography

(redirected from scenographically)

sce·nog·ra·phy

 (sē-nŏg′rə-fē)
n.
1. The art of representing objects in perspective, especially as applied in the design and painting of theatrical scenery.
2. Visual design for theatrical productions, including such elements as sets, costumes, and lighting.

sce·nog′raph·er n.
sce′no·graph′ic (sē′nə-grăf′ĭk) adj.

scenography

(siːˈnɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Art Terms) the art of portraying objects or scenes in perspective
2. (Art Terms) scene painting, esp in ancient Greece
[C17: via Latin from Greek skēnographia a drawing in perspective, from skēnē scene]
sceˈnographer n
scenographic, ˌscenoˈgraphical adj
ˌscenoˈgraphically adv

scenography

the rendering of an object on a perspective plane. — scenographer, n. — scenographic, scenographical, adj.
See also: Drawing
Translations

scenography

[siːˈnɒgrəfɪ] Nescenografía f
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lining the walls of the same gallery were displays of elaborate costumes and wearable pieces, their already otherworldly forms enhanced by the scenographically heightened lighting.
The latter might even include visual artists who work scenographically or employ performance.
For the duration of the exhibition a scenographically designed presentation is desired, which is a high adventure and information value for different target groups with differentiated levels of understanding, interactive elements and a mixture of dioramas, showcases and multimedia productions.
The judgmental nature of society is scenographically represented by a miniature village of houses with spectacles attached to sticks towering out of them.
The pile of sooty 'skulls', which I mentioned in the beginning, was not only scenographically striking.
Scenographically the production relies on the memory of the viewers, much in line with the play, which deliberately expects the viewers to recall and reconstruct scenes from the novel that were left out of the play.
108: 'The Villa Rotonda appears to be conceived as an isolated object, independent of its site, due to its centralised form and the lack of connected outbuildings However, from the original entry the planted fields of Monte Berico frame the building, linking it scenographically to the site as securely as the barchesse of other Palladian villas'