sceptre


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scep·tre

 (sĕp′tər)
n. & v. Chiefly British
Variant of scepter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sceptre

(ˈsɛptə) or

scepter

n
1. a ceremonial staff held by a monarch as the symbol of authority
2. imperial authority; sovereignty
vb
(tr) to invest with authority
[C13: from Old French sceptre, from Latin scēptrum, from Greek skeptron staff]
ˈsceptred, ˈsceptered adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

scep•ter

(ˈsɛp tər)

n.
1. a rod or wand borne in the hand as an emblem of regal or imperial power.
2. royal or imperial power or authority; sovereignty.
v.t.
3. to give a scepter to; invest with authority.
Also, esp. Brit., sceptre.
[1250–1300; Middle English (s)ceptre < Old French < Latin scēptrum < Greek skêptron staff]
scep′tral (-trəl) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

sceptre


Past participle: sceptred
Gerund: sceptring

Imperative
sceptre
sceptre
Present
I sceptre
you sceptre
he/she/it sceptres
we sceptre
you sceptre
they sceptre
Preterite
I sceptred
you sceptred
he/she/it sceptred
we sceptred
you sceptred
they sceptred
Present Continuous
I am sceptring
you are sceptring
he/she/it is sceptring
we are sceptring
you are sceptring
they are sceptring
Present Perfect
I have sceptred
you have sceptred
he/she/it has sceptred
we have sceptred
you have sceptred
they have sceptred
Past Continuous
I was sceptring
you were sceptring
he/she/it was sceptring
we were sceptring
you were sceptring
they were sceptring
Past Perfect
I had sceptred
you had sceptred
he/she/it had sceptred
we had sceptred
you had sceptred
they had sceptred
Future
I will sceptre
you will sceptre
he/she/it will sceptre
we will sceptre
you will sceptre
they will sceptre
Future Perfect
I will have sceptred
you will have sceptred
he/she/it will have sceptred
we will have sceptred
you will have sceptred
they will have sceptred
Future Continuous
I will be sceptring
you will be sceptring
he/she/it will be sceptring
we will be sceptring
you will be sceptring
they will be sceptring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sceptring
you have been sceptring
he/she/it has been sceptring
we have been sceptring
you have been sceptring
they have been sceptring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sceptring
you will have been sceptring
he/she/it will have been sceptring
we will have been sceptring
you will have been sceptring
they will have been sceptring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sceptring
you had been sceptring
he/she/it had been sceptring
we had been sceptring
you had been sceptring
they had been sceptring
Conditional
I would sceptre
you would sceptre
he/she/it would sceptre
we would sceptre
you would sceptre
they would sceptre
Past Conditional
I would have sceptred
you would have sceptred
he/she/it would have sceptred
we would have sceptred
you would have sceptred
they would have sceptred
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sceptre - the imperial authority symbolized by a sceptersceptre - the imperial authority symbolized by a scepter
sovereignty, reign - royal authority; the dominion of a monarch
2.sceptre - a ceremonial or emblematic staffsceptre - a ceremonial or emblematic staff  
staff - a rod carried as a symbol
bauble - a mock scepter carried by a court jester
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
صَوْلَجان، قَضيب
žezlo
scepter
žezlo
veldissproti
skeptras
scepteris
asa

sceptre

scepter (US) [ˈseptəʳ] Ncetro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sceptre

[ˈsɛptər] (British) scepter (US) nsceptre m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sceptre

, (US) scepter
nZepter nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sceptre

scepter (Am) [ˈsɛptəʳ] nscettro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sceptre

(ˈseptə(r)) (American) scepter (ˈseptə) noun
the ornamental rod carried by a monarch on ceremonial occasions as a sign of power.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
With this the son of Peleus dashed his gold-bestudded sceptre on the ground and took his seat, while the son of Atreus was beginning fiercely from his place upon the other side.
Your sceptre of the god and your wreath shall profit you nothing.
The fellow had a pretty fancy in names: the "Orb" Deposit Bank, the "Sceptre" Mutual Aid Society, the "Thrift and Independence" Association.
During a period of general business prosperity he set up The Orb Bank and The Sceptre Trust, simply, it seems for advertising purposes.
They had made a harpooneer of him, and that barbed iron was in lieu of a sceptre now.
They were particularly their generals in war, and presided over their sacrifices, excepting such only as belonged to the priests: they were also the supreme judges over the people; and in this case some of them took an oath, others did not; they did, the form of swearing was by their sceptre held out.
And behind him, with a cup in one hand and a raised sceptre in the other, walked Phylacus and spake amongst the bondmen.'
When she sat on her splendid emerald throne in the great Throne Room of her palace and made laws and settled disputes and tried to keep all her subjects happy and contented, she was as dignified and demure as any queen might be; but when she had thrown aside her jeweled robe of state and her sceptre, and had retired to her private apartments, the girl-- joyous, light-hearted and free--replaced the sedate Ruler.
Then, this young gentleman, going to a little cupboard, returned with a thigh-bone, which in former times must have been part and parcel of some individual at least as long as himself, and placed the same in the hands of Mr Tappertit; who, receiving it as a sceptre and staff of authority, cocked his three-cornered hat fiercely on the top of his head, and mounted a large table, whereon a chair of state, cheerfully ornamented with a couple of skulls, was placed ready for his reception.
All these dark and direful ceremonies being at length completed, the table was put aside, the chair of state removed, the sceptre locked up in its usual cupboard, the doors of communication between the three cellars thrown freely open, and the 'Prentice Knights resigned themselves to merriment.
Though this latter supposition may seem harsh, and might not be likely often to be verified, yet it ought not to be forgotten that the demon of faction will, at certain seasons, extend his sceptre over all numerous bodies of men.
"It would be better if it were the other way," said the traveller, "the sceptre on the head and the crown in the hand; but if so, may be there is within some company of players, with whom it is a common thing to have those crowns and sceptres you speak of; for in such a small inn as this, and where such silence is kept, I do not believe any people entitled to crowns and sceptres can have taken up their quarters."