schema

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sche·ma

 (skē′mə)
n. pl. sche·ma·ta (skē-mä′tə, skĭ-măt′ə) or sche·mas
1. A plan, outline, or model: a schema for prioritizing vaccinations; a writer's schema for a novel.
2. Psychology A pattern imposed on complex reality or experience to assist in explaining it, mediate perception, or guide response.

[Latin schēma, schēmat-, form; see scheme.]

schema

(ˈskiːmə)
n, pl -mata (-mətə)
1. a plan, diagram, or scheme
2. (Philosophy) (in the philosophy of Kant) a rule or principle that enables the understanding to apply its categories and unify experience: universal succession is the schema of causality.
3. (Psychology) psychol a mental model of aspects of the world or of the self that is structured in such a way as to facilitate the processes of cognition and perception
4. (Logic) logic an expression using metavariables that may be replaced by object language expressions to yield a well-formed formula. Thus A = A is an axiom schema for identity, representing the infinite number of axioms, x = x, y = y, z = z, etc
[C19: from Greek: form]

sche•ma

(ˈski mə)

n., pl. sche•ma•ta (ˈski mə tə or, sometimes, skiˈmɑ tə, skɪ-)
sche•mas.
1. a diagram, plan, or scheme.
2. an underlying organizational pattern or structure; conceptual framework.
[1790–1800; < Greek schêma form, scheme]

schema

an outline or diagrammatic representation. See also drawing. — schematic, adj.
See also: Representation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.schema - an internal representation of the world; an organization of concepts and actions that can be revised by new information about the world
internal representation, mental representation, representation - a presentation to the mind in the form of an idea or image
2.schema - a schematic or preliminary plan
plan, program, programme - a series of steps to be carried out or goals to be accomplished; "they drew up a six-step plan"; "they discussed plans for a new bond issue"

schema

noun
A method for making, doing, or accomplishing something:
Translations
schéma

schema

[ˈskiːmə] N (schemata (pl)) [ˈskiːmətə]esquema m

schema

n pl <-ta> → Darstellung f; (Philos) → Schema nt

schema

[ˈskiːmə] n (schemata (pl)) (frm) → schema

sche·ma

n. esquema, plan, planeamiento.
References in periodicals archive ?
Human memory depends on cumulative schemata in order to operate and make sense of ever changing and varied interaction with the world at large.
Drawing from early researches (Bransford and Johnson1972 Rumelhart1980) Semino (1995:4) describes meaning potential within schema theory as not something that is actually contained' in the text but meaning is built by an interaction between the interlocutor and the text where the interlocutor retrieves several schemata from their memory.
Schema theory is relevant to the comprehension of literature because it creates text worlds that can only be comprehended if schemata are activated.
The characters within the textual world too need to adjust their schemata as the narrative moves and takes them through its world.
Table 1 outlines each of the early maladaptive schema domains and individual schemata.
Schemata influence how individuals interpret their world, including their interactions, perceptions, and emotions related to intimate partners (Dattilio 2006).
To date, only one study has examined the early maladaptive schemas of intimate partners of substance abusers, and the interrelation of schemata among couples where one partner is abusing substances.
While data modellers learn about data modelling by means of small "toy" examples, the database schemata that are developed in practical projects tend to become very large.
Therefore, the common observation that very large database schemata are error-prone, hard to read and consequently difficult to maintain is not surprising at all.
For instance, modular techniques such as design by units [18] allow schemata to be drastically simplified by exploiting principles of hiding and encapsulation that are known from Software Engineering.
The students in this study appeared to have the language, the contextual, and the mathematical schemata necessary to engage in problem solving.
In Johnson's words (1987: 29), "image schemata operate at a level of mental organization that falls between abstract propositional structures, on the one side, and particular concrete images, on the other".