schema

(redirected from schemata)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

sche·ma

 (skē′mə)
n. pl. sche·ma·ta (skē-mä′tə, skĭ-măt′ə) or sche·mas
1. A plan, outline, or model: a schema for prioritizing vaccinations; a writer's schema for a novel.
2. Psychology A pattern imposed on complex reality or experience to assist in explaining it, mediate perception, or guide response.

[Latin schēma, schēmat-, form; see scheme.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

schema

(ˈskiːmə)
n, pl -mata (-mətə)
1. a plan, diagram, or scheme
2. (Philosophy) (in the philosophy of Kant) a rule or principle that enables the understanding to apply its categories and unify experience: universal succession is the schema of causality.
3. (Psychology) psychol a mental model of aspects of the world or of the self that is structured in such a way as to facilitate the processes of cognition and perception
4. (Logic) logic an expression using metavariables that may be replaced by object language expressions to yield a well-formed formula. Thus A = A is an axiom schema for identity, representing the infinite number of axioms, x = x, y = y, z = z, etc
[C19: from Greek: form]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sche•ma

(ˈski mə)

n., pl. sche•ma•ta (ˈski mə tə or, sometimes, skiˈmɑ tə, skɪ-)
sche•mas.
1. a diagram, plan, or scheme.
2. an underlying organizational pattern or structure; conceptual framework.
[1790–1800; < Greek schêma form, scheme]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

schema

an outline or diagrammatic representation. See also drawing. — schematic, adj.
See also: Representation
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.schema - an internal representation of the world; an organization of concepts and actions that can be revised by new information about the world
internal representation, mental representation, representation - a presentation to the mind in the form of an idea or image
2.schema - a schematic or preliminary plan
plan, program, programme - a series of steps to be carried out or goals to be accomplished; "they drew up a six-step plan"; "they discussed plans for a new bond issue"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

schema

noun
A method for making, doing, or accomplishing something:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
schéma

schema

[ˈskiːmə] N (schemata (pl)) [ˈskiːmətə]esquema m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

schema

n pl <-ta> → Darstellung f; (Philos) → Schema nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

schema

[ˈskiːmə] n (schemata (pl)) (frm) → schema
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sche·ma

n. esquema, plan, planeamiento.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In sections on original gestures, articulating processes, and schemata in action, they discuss such aspects as early forms of articulation, language and image as gesture and articulation, habit and the symbolic process, and ancient articulation: antique schemata in modern art and dance.
This original empirical research compares the negotiation schemata of Finnish and Japanese IT business people.
(2) As Rumelhart explains, "schemata can represent knowledge at all levels-from ideologies and cultural truths to knowledge about the meaning of a particular word, to knowledge about what patterns of excitations are associated with what letters of the alphabet.
Human memory depends on cumulative schemata in order to operate and make sense of ever changing and varied interaction with the world at large.
When we read a text, as Keith Oatley states, "we assimilate what we read to the schemata of what we already know.
Table 1 outlines each of the early maladaptive schema domains and individual schemata.
While data modellers learn about data modelling by means of small "toy" examples, the database schemata that are developed in practical projects tend to become very large.
We use our schemata (the plural form of schema) to organize information to aid our understanding, remembering, and figuring out what to do (Sternberg, 2006).
Artificial Intelligence work on text understanding was drawn on by discourse analysis and reading theory and it provided an insight into the way in which knowledge schemata (i.e.

Full browser ?