scholastic


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scho·las·tic

 (skə-lăs′tĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to schools; academic: scholastic accomplishment.
2. often Scholastic Of, relating to, or characteristic of Scholasticism.
3. Overly subtle or pedantic: "The debates ... between communist and socialist formations [of the unions] on an industrial and labor strategy were often scholastic and tortuous" (Norman Birnbaum).
n.
1. often Scholastic A Scholastic philosopher or theologian.
2. A dogmatist or pedant.

[Latin scholasticus, from Greek skholastikos, learned, studious, from skholazein, to study, from skholē, school; see segh- in Indo-European roots.]

scho·las′ti·cal·ly adv.

scholastic

(skəˈlæstɪk) or

scholastical

adj
1. of, relating to, or befitting schools, scholars, or education
2. pedantic or precise
3. (Historical Terms) (often capital) characteristic of or relating to the medieval Schoolmen
n
4. a student or pupil
5. a person who is given to quibbling or logical subtleties; pedant
6. (Historical Terms) (often capital) a disciple or adherent of scholasticism; Schoolman
7. (Roman Catholic Church)
a. a Jesuit student who is undergoing a period of probation prior to commencing his theological studies
b. the status and position of such a student
8. (Art Terms) a formalist in art
[C16: via Latin from Greek skholastikos devoted to learning, ultimately from skholē school1]
schoˈlastically adv

scho•las•tic

(skəˈlæs tɪk)

adj. Also, scho•las′ti•cal.
1. of or pertaining to schools, scholars, or education.
2. of or pertaining to secondary schools.
3. pedantic.
n.
4. (sometimes cap.) an adherent of scholasticism.
5. a pedantic person.
[1590–1600; < Latin scholasticus < Greek scholastikós studious, learned, derivative of scholázein to be at leisure to study. See school1, -tic]
scho•las′ti•cal•ly, adv.

scholastic

- Based on Latin scholasticus, "devote one's leisure to learning."
See also related terms for leisure.

scholastic

Involving or typical of schools, education, or scholarship.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scholastic - a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they meritscholastic - a person who pays more attention to formal rules and book learning than they merit
purist - someone who insists on great precision and correctness (especially in the use of words)
bookman, scholar, scholarly person, student - a learned person (especially in the humanities); someone who by long study has gained mastery in one or more disciplines
2.Scholastic - a Scholastic philosopher or theologian
philosopher - a specialist in philosophy
Adj.1.scholastic - of or relating to schools; "scholastic year"
2.scholastic - of or relating to the philosophical doctrine of scholasticism; "scholastic philosophy"

scholastic

adjective learned, academic, scholarly, lettered, literary, bookish the values which encouraged her scholastic achievement

scholastic

adjective
Characterized by a narrow concern for book learning and formal rules, without knowledge or experience of practical matters:
Translations

scholastic

[skəˈlæstɪk]
A. ADJ
1. (= educational) → escolar
scholastic bookslibros mpl escolares
the scholastic yearel año escolar
the scholastic professionel magisterio
Scholastic Aptitude Test (US) → examen m de acceso a la universidad
2. (= relative to scholasticism) → escolástico
B. Nescolástico m

scholastic

[skəˈlæstɪk] adj [achievement, ability] → scolaireScholastic Aptitude Test n (US)examen m d'entrée à l'université

scholastic

adj
(= relative to school)schulisch, Schul-; (Univ) → Studien-; her scholastic recordihre schulischen Leistungen, ihre Schulleistungen; (Univ) → ihre Studienleistungen; the scholastic professionder Lehrberuf; scholastic aptitude test (US) Eignungstest vor der Zulassung zu einem College/einer Universität ? also SAT
(= relative to scholasticism)scholastisch

scholastic

[skəˈlæstɪk] adjscolastico/a
References in classic literature ?
He had the good memory which is more useful for scholastic achievements than mental power, and he knew Mr.
Know ye that we have taken under our protection (at the request of David de Bruce) John Barbour, Archdeacon of Aberdeen, with the scholars in his company, in coming into our kingdom of England, in order to study in the university of Oxford, and perform his scholastic exercises, and in remaining there and in returning to his own country of Scotland.
Porters') revealed a homage of the heart, whereof Miss Twinkleton, in her scholastic state of existence, is as ignorant as a granite pillar.
I heard that the man with the wooden leg, whose name was Tungay, was an obstinate barbarian who had formerly assisted in the hop business, but had come into the scholastic line with Mr.
They led Don Quixote into a room, and Sancho removed his armour, leaving him in loose Walloon breeches and chamois-leather doublet, all stained with the rust of his armour; his collar was a falling one of scholastic cut, without starch or lace, his buskins buff-coloured, and his shoes polished.
One or two of their number had contrived to obtain an air of scholastic gravity by wearing spectacles.
There are scholastic agencies by which one may identify any man who has been in the profession.
That is why I have sternly set my face against any proffered scholastic appointment.
He was about two or three and fifty, and a trifle below the middle size; he wore a white neckerchief with long ends, and a suit of scholastic black; but his coat sleeves being a great deal too long, and his trousers a great deal too short, he appeared ill at ease in his clothes, and as if he were in a perpetual state of astonishment at finding himself so respectable.
At the age of twelve he, like Wyatt, was sent to Cambridge, where his chief impression was of disgust at the unfruitful scholastic application of Aristotle's ideas, still supreme in spite of a century of Renaissance enlightenment.
As I expect to be particularly calm and abstracted in my last moments, if you add a few details, concerning the fortitude and scholastic dignity with which I met my death, it may serve to encourage future aspirants for similar honours, and assuredly give offence to no one.
Childers (rather deeply lined in the jaws by daylight), and the Little Wonder of Scholastic Equitation, and in a word, all the company.

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