scholasticism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

scho·las·ti·cism

 (skə-lăs′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. often Scholasticism The dominant form of theological and philosophical study in Western Christianity in the Middle Ages, based on the authority of the Latin Fathers and of Aristotle and his commentators.
2. Close adherence to traditional methods or teachings.

scholasticism

(skəˈlæstɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Historical Terms) (sometimes capital) the system of philosophy, theology, and teaching that dominated medieval western Europe and was based on the writings of the Church Fathers and (from the 12th century) Aristotle
2. strict adherence to traditional doctrines

scho•las•ti•cism

(skəˈlæs təˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. (sometimes cap.) the system of theological and philosophical teaching predominant in the Middle Ages, based chiefly upon the authority of the church fathers and of Aristotle and his commentators.
2. narrow adherence to traditional teachings, doctrines, or methods.
[1750–60]

Scholasticism

the doctrines of the schoolmen; the system of theological and philosophical instruction of the Middle Ages, based chiefly upon the authority of the church fathers and on Aristotle and his commentators. — Scholastic, n., adj.
See also: Theology
the doctrines of the schoolmen; the system of theological and philosophical instruction of the Middle Ages, based chiefly upon the authority of the church fathers and on Aristotle and his commentators. — Scholastic, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy

scholasticism

A term for the medieval philosophy taught in schools, and exemplified by Thomas Aquinas.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scholasticism - the system of philosophy dominant in medieval Europe; based on Aristotle and the Church Fathers
natural virtue - (scholasticism) one of the four virtues (prudence, justice, fortitude, and temperance) derived from nature
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.scholasticism - orthodoxy of a scholastic variety
traditionalism, traditionality - strict adherence to traditional methods or teachings
Translations

scholasticism

[skəˈlæstɪsɪzəm] Nescolasticismo m

scholasticism

nScholastik f
References in classic literature ?
This impulse by which the medieval society of scholasticism, feudalism, and chivalry was to be made over into what we call the modern world came first from Italy.
Among their topics are some indications as to what a small firm is from the business organization of late medieval Germany merchants, late scholasticism and commercial partnerships: people and capital in the 16th and 17th centuries, incorporation and limited liability in 17th-century England: the case of the East India Company, from commercial guilds to commercial law: Spanish company regulations 1737-1848, and partnerships as flexible and open-purpose entities: legal and commercial practice in 19th-century Antwerp.
A few chapters in this new book by Joshua Parens discuss not only this difference, but also the erroneous interpretations that can arise and that have arisen when medieval Jewish and Muslim thinkers are interpreted with the methods and presuppositions applicable to the study of medieval Christian thought or scholasticism.
For several generations scholars have understood that the genesis of modern natural-rights theory stretches far back beyond the Enlightenment and finds its origins in the scholasticism of the twelfth to the sixteenth centuries.
Renaissance Truths: Humanism, Scholasticism and the Search for the Perfect Language.
Ens rationis from Suarez to Caramuel: A Study in Scholasticism of the Baroque Era.
Pop accounts of the history of early modern thought famously present Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and company as having liberated Western philosophy and science from the bogeyman of medieval Scholasticism.
McGinn's life-story of this seminal text begins with a brief chapter surveying Aquinas's 13th-century Scholastic context, warning us that Scholasticism cannot be reduced to a set of "teachings or to a single system of thought" (11).
New Scholasticism Meets Analytic Philosophy, Editiones Scholasticae, Heusenstamm, 2014, 128 pp.
The author's contribution, however, is to argue that scholasticism deserves to be seen in the framework of cultural history, above all, as a method of teaching.
His work is considered a turning point in the history of second scholasticism, marking the transition from its Renaissance to its Baroque phases.
This means that the proclivity for scholasticism, at once the strength and the great vice of universities, is accentuated.