sclerema


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to sclerema: Scleroderma, scleroderma neonatorum

sclerema

(sklərˈiːmə)
n
(Medicine) a condition in which body tissues harden, esp those of the fatty layer just under the skin
References in periodicals archive ?
Skin changes--Multiple pustules, abscesses, sclerema, mottling, umbilical redness and discharge.
Clinical sepsis was defined as neonates with 2 or more of the following features which includes (1) temperature instability, (2) cardiovascular instability, (3) respiratory instability, (4) gastrointestinal instability, (5) petechial rash or sclerema, and (6) nonspecific features [10].
The main differential diagnosis is neonatal sclerema, characterized by diffuse hardening of the subcutaneous adipose tissues, which is distinct from the localized lesions of SCFNN.
Other skin lesions found were petechiae (1), purpura (1), sclerema (1), loss of subcutaneous fat (1), hypospadiasis (1), generalized edema (1), ophthalmia neonatorum (1), micrognathia (2), lentigines (1), simian crease (2), umbilical hernia (1), prominent veins (1), hairy pinna (1), hydrocele (1), phimosis (1), insect bite (1), cleft lip and cleft palate (1) , cellulitis (1), scrotal dermatitis (1), triangular face (1).
The clinical criteria are (1) body temperature instability; (2) cardiovascular instability; (3) presence of the skin and subcutaneous lesions such as petechial rash or sclerema; (4) apnea or increased oxygen requirement, requirement for ventilation support; (5) feeding intolerance or abdominal distension; and (6) irritability, lethargy, or hypotonia.
Sclerema neonatorum (SN) is a rare and severe skin condition presenting with generalized hardening of subcutaneous tissues [1].
Its clinical manifestation is very similar to the sclerema neonatorum whereas basic treatment method is about the same.
Sclerema neonatorum is a very rare panniculitis affecting primarily ill preterm neonates in the first week of life.
Skin: There may be multiple pustules, sclerema, mottling, umbilical redness and discharge.
Table XII shows that out of 1000 neonates, miliaria crystallina (35.3%) was the most common and sclerema neonatorum (0.1%) was the least common non-infectious skin disorders.
Sclerema neonatorum is another rare condition characterized by diffuse hardening of the skin affecting infants up to 4 months of age with severe underlying disease and systemic symptoms.
Miscellaneous Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon Purpura fulminans Kawasaki disease Sclerema neonatorum Erythromelalgia Other