sclerophylly

sclerophylly

(sklɪərˈɒfɪlɪ)
n
the feature of having hard leaves, as in sclerophyllous plants
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sclerophylly index (IE) was calculated [28] using the formula: (g [dm.sup.-1]) = leaf dry weight/leaf area.
Landscape fire has been the subject of several environmental histories that reach back millions of years to describe the northern migration of Australia away from its Gondwanan relations, its leaching, drying and increasing susceptibility to fire, and the shift in vegetation from rainforest to sclerophylly (Franklin, 2006; Griffiths, 2001; Pyne, 1998).
The low availability of nutrients in Cerrado soils and the elevated rate of leaf sclerophylly have been used to explain the low leaf herbivory caused by chewing insects (Neves et al., 2010).
glabra, resulting in higher herbivory damage than in a preserved area, and despite a similar investment in defense against herbivores (density of EFNs and leaf sclerophylly).
Gall-forming and free-feeding herbivory along vertical gradients in a lowland tropical rainforest: the importance of leaf sclerophylly. Ecography 30: 663-672.
Soil phosphate and its role in molding the Australian flora and vegetation, with special reference to xeromorphy and sclerophylly. Ecology, 47:992-1007.
Sclerophylly tends to be associated with good root development as the plants try to reach the deep layers of soil which contain water reserves.