scleroprotein


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scle·ro·pro·tein

 (sklîr′ō-prō′tēn′, -tē-ĭn)
n.
Any of a class of fibrous, generally insoluble proteins, such as collagen, that form strong filaments and are the chief constituents of connective tissue. Also called albuminoid.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scleroprotein

(ˌsklɪərəʊˈprəʊtiːn)
n
(Biochemistry) any of a group of insoluble stable proteins such as keratin, elastin, and collagen that occur in skeletal and connective tissues. Also called: albuminoid
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scleroprotein - a simple protein found in horny and cartilaginous tissues and in the lens of the eyescleroprotein - a simple protein found in horny and cartilaginous tissues and in the lens of the eye
collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
elastin - a fibrous scleroprotein found in elastic tissues such as the walls of arteries
gelatin, gelatine - a colorless water-soluble glutinous protein obtained from animal tissues such as bone and skin
chondrin - a substance that resembles gelatin and is obtained by boiling cartilage in water
ceratin, keratin - a fibrous scleroprotein that occurs in the outer layer of the skin and in horny tissues such as hair, feathers, nails, and hooves
simple protein - a protein that yields only amino acids when hydrolyzed
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
scléroprotéine
References in periodicals archive ?
They are composed of a complex scleroprotein named conchiolin and calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite and or calcite arranged in concentric layers.
For scleroprotein, like collagen fibers, there was no significant impact on its surface morphology without any side effects, just cavitations after ultrasonic processing [22].
This may be due to the presence of keratin--a scleroprotein that makes up 85% to 90% of feather meal--which has highly stable S-S and S-H linkages that are not readily broken down by animals without processing (Papadopoulos et al., 1986).