dentin

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den·tin

 (dĕn′tĭn) or den·tine (-tēn′)
n.
The main, calcareous part of a tooth, beneath the enamel and surrounding the pulp chamber and root canals.

den′tin·al (dĕn′tə-nəl, dĕn-tē′-) adj.

den•tin

(ˈdɛn tn, -tɪn)

also den•tine

(-tin)

n.
the hard, calcareous tissue, similar to but denser than bone, that forms the major portion of a tooth, surrounds the pulp cavity, and is situated beneath the enamel and cementum.
[1830–40; < Latin dent-, s. of dēns tooth + -in1]
den′tin•al, adj.

den·tin

(dĕn′tĭn)
The main bony part of a tooth beneath the enamel, surrounding the pulp chamber and root canals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dentin - a calcareous material harder and denser than bone that comprises the bulk of a toothdentin - a calcareous material harder and denser than bone that comprises the bulk of a tooth
animal material - material derived from animals
ivory, tusk - a hard smooth ivory colored dentine that makes up most of the tusks of elephants and walruses
2.dentin - bone (calcified tissue) surrounding the pulp cavity of a tooth
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
tooth - hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense
Translations

den·tin

n. dentina, marfil dentario, tejido calcificado de un diente.

dentin

n dentina
References in periodicals archive ?
The other studies performed with atomic force microscopy mention that the microstructural characteristics of dentinal substrate in affected dentin have a different behavior; since the sclerotic dentin has a significantly higher resistance to the action of orthophosphoric acid, the fluorotic dentin can be compared with it; both have lower density in dentinal tubules and this affected their micromorphology [20].
Unfortunately, the presence of sclerotic dentin is related to a group of various lesions of mixed etiology known as non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL) (Grippo et al., 2004), the incidence of which is rising due to higher life expectancy and more dental pieces in the oral cavity (Borcic et al., 2004).
Teeth with attrition, abrasion and erosion were excluded as they are shown to produce secondary changes in the tooth structure like alteration in mineral composition and the formation of sclerotic dentin.20