scone


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Related to scone: Stone of Scone

Scone

 (sko͞on)
A village of central Scotland northeast of Perth. The old part of the village was the coronation site of Scottish kings until 1651. The Stone of Scone, or Stone of Destiny, which served as a throne during the coronation rites, was taken to England by Edward I in 1296 and kept in Westminster Abbey beneath the chair used during the crowning of British monarchs. The Stone of Scone was returned to Scotland in November 1996.

scone

 (skōn, skŏn)
n.
1. A small, rich, biscuitlike pastry or quick bread, sometimes baked on a griddle.
2. Utah Yeast bread dough, deep-fried and served with honey and butter or with a savory filling.

[Perhaps from Dutch schoonbrood, fine white bread, from Middle Dutch schoonbroot : schoon, bright + broot, bread.]

scone

n
1. (Cookery) a light plain doughy cake made from flour with very little fat, cooked in an oven or (esp originally) on a griddle, usually split open and buttered
2. Austral a slang word for head1
adj
slang
a. angry
b. insane
[C16: Scottish, perhaps from Middle Low German schonbrot, Middle Dutch schoonbrot fine bread]

Scone

(skuːn)
n
(Placename) a parish in Perth and Kinross, E Scotland, consisting of the two villages of New Scone and Old Scone, formerly the site of the Pictish capital and the stone upon which medieval Scottish kings were crowned. The stone was removed to Westminster Abbey by Edward I in 1296; it was returned to Scotland in 1996 and placed in Edinburgh Castle. Scone Palace was rebuilt in the Neo-Gothic style in the 19th century

scone

(skoʊn, skɒn)

n.
a light, biscuitlike quick bread, often baked on a griddle.
[1505–15; orig. Scots, perhaps shortened < earlier Dutch schoonbrot fine bread, white bread. See sheen, bread]

Scone

(skun, skoʊn)

n.
a village in central Scotland: site of coronation of Scottish kings.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scone - small biscuit (rich with cream and eggs) cut into diamonds or sticks and baked in an oven or (especially originally) on a griddlescone - small biscuit (rich with cream and eggs) cut into diamonds or sticks and baked in an oven or (especially originally) on a griddle
quick bread - breads made with a leavening agent that permits immediate baking
drop scone, griddlecake, Scotch pancake - a scone made by dropping a spoonful of batter on a griddle
Translations
koláček
scone
lítil hveitikaka, skonsa
plācenis
koláčik
skon

scone

[skɒn] Nbollo m (inglés)

scone

[ˈskɒn] nscone m

scone

(skon) , ((American) skoun) noun
a kind of small, flat cake made of flour and fat. scones and jam.
References in classic literature ?
They were received with great rejoicing and crowned at Scone. But the new King soon found, that during the long years he had been kept a prisoner in England his kingdom had fallen into wild disorder.
While they ate (Philip had a scone and butter and a cup of chocolate), he discovered that his companion was called Dunsford.
"You know, sire, that being called in 1650 to Edinburgh, during Cromwell's expedition into Ireland, I was crowned at Scone. A year after, wounded in one of the provinces he had usurped, Cromwell returned upon us.
I assure you he must be a very bad painter; only the other day I saw him looking longingly into the window of a cheap Italian restaurant, and in the end he had to crush down his aspirations with two penny scones.
In a few minutes Trent was seated in a comfortable and solid chair with a little round table by his side, drinking tea and eating buttered scones, and if not altogether at his ease very nearly so.
You are to remember that we lay on the bare top of a rock, like scones upon a girdle; the sun beat upon us cruelly; the rock grew so heated, a man could scarce endure the touch of it; and the little patch of earth and fern, which kept cooler, was only large enough for one at a time.
You were living like a savage when I came along and found you--eating nothing but tinned meat and scones that would have ruined the digestion of a camel.
Their brother, finding the incident commonplace, had stolen upstairs to see whether there were scones for tea.
A spokesman said: "We're updating the image and the old poster will be scone before they know it."
"I marvel at that view every morning when I'm in at the crack of dawn baking the scones and cakes.
However, in recent years, the cafes in many large hotels have also begun making scones, but these are round in shape.
After last year's impressive efforts, David has agreed there should be a prize for presentation as well as an overall prize for the best scone and a runner-up.