scopophilic

scopophilic

(ˌskɒpəˈfɪlɪk)
adj
(Psychiatry) of or relating to scopophilia
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The viewer is positioned as voyeuristically occupying the scopophilic heterosexual gaze.
Murdoch has satirized this cultural tendency to "objectify" women through what Emily Tait calls "voyeuristic description with scopophilic intensity" (56).
Arching her back in concentration, she's looking at the canvas too, but differently--not with the scopophilic acquisitiveness of a herd breezing through galleries, not to have seen; rather, she is looking with the tenderness required to usher an image into being.
In the system of representation of old women, it inserts the body as an element that conveys, potentializes and helps to define this old age, but refuses to adhere to the denial of aging provided by body technologies (allied to gender technologies that insist on objectifying and reifying women before the scopophilic gaze of men).
In poem II the voice impersonates a hyperbolic sexual gaze, taking over a masculine role as agent of desire in traditional love lyric and transgendering scopophilic discourses in romance.
Hence, they are fighting on two fronts: to dismiss the patriarchal system of women's objectification for male scopophilic satisfaction, in order to be on equal footing with men.
While the scene self awarely speaks to love as literal reflection of an ideal, it is unable to break out of the shared gaze to create a new paradigm for female agency or a space within the film away from the scopophilic. Therefore, although Medem certainly questions the idea of compulsory heterosexuality and women's agency in history, the film does not satisfy Butler's call for "subversive repetition", one capable of calling attention to the regulatory practices of not only notions of gender and sexuality, but also those of nationality and historical truth.
It was a camera-based narration which, according to them, identified the film spectator as a subject in a complex process of interpellation: the spectator momentarily becomes a part of the cinematic apparatus by camera-based narration, which appealed to scopophilic and voyeuristic desires and fantasies relying on the unconscious constitution of the subjectivity.
"In a world ordered by sexual imbalance, [where] pleasure in looking has been split between active/male and passive/female", the heroine comes to understand and fashion her appearance as an accumulation of visual signifiers appealing to the (scopophilic) male gaze (Mulvey 11).
Mulvey (1989) noted that this identification process is predicated on the psychoanalytic pleasure derived by the viewer through the satiation of their scopophilic desires.