scornful


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scorn

 (skôrn)
n.
1.
a. Contempt or disdain felt toward a person or object considered despicable or unworthy: viewed his rivals with scorn.
b. The expression of such an attitude in behavior or speech; derision: heaped scorn upon his rivals.
c. The state of being despised or dishonored: held in scorn by his rivals.
2. Archaic One spoken of or treated with contempt.
tr.v. scorned, scorn·ing, scorns
1. To consider or treat as contemptible or unworthy: an artist who was scorned by conservative critics.
2. To reject or refuse with derision: scorned their offer of help. See Synonyms at despise.
3. To consider or reject (doing something) as beneath one's dignity: "She disapproved so heartily of Flora's plan that she would have scorned to assist in the concoction of a single oily sentence" (Stella Gibbons).

[Middle English, from Old French escarn, of Germanic origin.]

scorn′er n.
scorn′ful adj.
scorn′ful·ly adv.
scorn′ful·ness n.

scorn•ful

(ˈskɔrn fəl)

adj.
full of scorn; derisive; contemptuous.
[1350–1400]
scorn′ful•ly, adv.
scorn′ful•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.scornful - expressing extreme contempt
disrespectful - exhibiting lack of respect; rude and discourteous; "remarks disrespectful of the law"; "disrespectful in the presence of his parents"; "disrespectful toward his teacher"

scornful

scornful

adjective
Showing scorn and disrespect toward (someone or something):
Translations
مُحْتَقِر، مُزْدَرٍمُظْهِرٌ للإحْتِقار، مُسْتَخِف
pohrdavýopovržlivý
hånendehånlig
fitymáló
fullur fyrirlitningarfyrirlitningar-
pogardliwy
prezirljiv
hakaret doluküçümseyen

scornful

[ˈskɔːnfʊl] ADJdesdeñoso, despreciativo
to be scornful about sthdesdeñar algo

scornful

[ˈskɔːrnfəl] adjméprisant(e)

scornful

adjverächtlich; laughter also, personspöttisch, höhnisch; to be scornful of somebody/somethingjdn/etw verachten; (verbally) → jdn/etw verhöhnen; to be scornful about somebody/somethingsich über jdn/etw verächtlich äußern

scornful

[ˈskɔːnfʊl] adjsprezzante
to be scornful about sth → parlare con disprezzo di qc

scorn

(skoːn) noun
contempt or disgust. He looked at my drawing with scorn.
verb
to show contempt for; to despise. They scorned my suggestion.
ˈscornful adjective
1. feeling or showing scorn. a scornful expression/remark.
2. making scornful remarks. He was rather scornful about your book.
ˈscornfully adverb
ˈscornfulness noun
References in classic literature ?
Instantly away we wandered In the shadowy twilight tide, She, the silent, scornful maiden, Walking calmly at my side, With a step serene and stately, All in beauty, all in pride.
Courageous, unconcerned, scornful, coercive--so wisdom wisheth us; she is a woman, and ever loveth only a warrior.
With its huge ungainly limbs sprawling unsymmetrically, and its gnarled hands and fingers, it stood an aged, stern, and scornful monster among the smiling birch trees.
In Bjornson there is nothing of Ibsen's scornful despair, nothing of his anarchistic contempt, but his art is full of the warmth and color of a poetic soul, with no touch of the icy cynicism which freezes you in the other.
Starting at the unforeseen concluding exclamation of the so suddenly scornful old man, Stubb was speechless a moment; then said excitedly, I am not used to be spoken to that way, sir; I do but less than half like it, sir.
Nicolete broke through my sentence with a scornful exclamation.
And when he came to the Doctor's big house full of beds he seemed angry and scornful.
de la S-, the most Scandinavian- looking of Provencal squires, fair, and six feet high, as became a descendant of sea-roving Northmen, authoritative, incisive, wittily scornful, with a comedy in three acts in his pocket, and in his breast a heart blighted by a hopeless passion for his beautiful cousin, married to a wealthy hide and tallow merchant.
When she had done, she somewhat irreverently cast it on the table, saying with a scornful smile,--'Your grandpapa has been so kind as to write to me.
Before it was altogether dark the curious crowd had collected in the street, silent, as a rule, and expectant, with here and there a scoffer uttering his incredulity and courage with scornful remarks or ribald cries.
Nevyedovsky affected to be not merely indifferent but scornful of this appellation, but it was obvious that he was highly delighted, and had to keep a curb on himself not to betray the triumph which was unsuitable to their new liberal tone.
His brief answer was so scornful that it made my question, natural though it was, seem absurd.