scoured


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Related to scoured: indicated, errand, culminating

scour 1

 (skour)
v. scoured, scour·ing, scours
v.tr.
1.
a. To clean, polish, or wash by scrubbing vigorously: scour a dirty oven.
b. To remove by scrubbing: scour grease from a pan.
2. To remove dirt or grease from (cloth or fibers) by means of a detergent.
3. To clean (wheat) before the milling process.
4. To clear (an area) by freeing of weeds or other vegetation.
5. To clear (a channel or pipe) by flushing.
v.intr.
1. To scrub something in order to clean or polish it.
2. To have diarrhea. Used of livestock.
n.
1. A scouring action or effect.
2. A place that has been scoured, as by flushing with water.
3. A cleansing agent for wool.
4. scours(used with a sing. or pl. verb) Diarrhea in livestock.

[Middle English scouren, from Middle Dutch scūren, from Old French escurer, from Late Latin excūrāre, to clean out : Latin ex-, ex-, Late Latin cūrāre, to clean (from Latin, to take care of, from cūra, care; see cure).]

scour′er n.

scour 2

 (skour)
v. scoured, scour·ing, scours
v.tr.
1. To search through or over thoroughly: The detective scoured the scene of the crime for clues.
2. To range over (an area) quickly and energetically.
v.intr.
1. To range over or about an area, especially in a search.
2. To move swiftly; scurry.

[Middle English scouren, to move swiftly, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skūr, shower.]

scour′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.scoured - worn away as by water or ice or wind
worn - affected by wear; damaged by long use; "worn threads on the screw"; "a worn suit"; "the worn pockets on the jacket"
References in classic literature ?
Rewards had been offered, the country had been scoured, but no Injun Joe was found.
He never could go after even a turnip-cart but he must have the swords and guns all scoured up for it, though they was only lath and broomsticks, and you might scour at them till you rotted, and then they warn't worth a mouthful of ashes more than what they was before.
After a long interval they returned, leading the frightened horse; but though they had scoured the country, and looked out and shouted from every height, they had seen nothing of his rider.
Tashtego's long, lean, sable hair, his high cheek bones, and black rounding eyes --for an Indian, Oriental in their largeness, but Antarctic in their glittering expression --all this sufficiently proclaimed him an inheritor of the unvitiated blood of those proud warrior hunters, who, in quest of the great New England moose, had scoured, bow in hand, the aboriginal forests of the main.
We gave her chase, in hopes of being informed by the crew whether there were any Arabian vessels at the mouth of the strait; but the Moors, who all entertain dismal apprehensions of the Franks, plied their oars and sail with the utmost diligence, and as soon as they reached land, quitted their boat, and scoured to the mountains.
He scoured and polished it as best he could, but he perceived one great defect in it, that it had no closed helmet, nothing but a simple morion.
For this purpose he ordered it to be well scoured with soap and sand and polished with wax, and then provided it with a substantial leather cush- ion.