screwworm


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screw·worm

 (skro͞o′wûrm′)
n.
The larva of the screwworm fly.

screwworm

(ˈskruːˌwɜːm)
n
1. (Animals) the larva of a dipterous fly, Callitroga macellaria, that develops beneath the skin of living mammals often causing illness or death
2. (Animals) the fly producing this larva: family Calliphoridae

screw•worm

(ˈskruˌwɜrm)

n.
the larva of a blow fly, Cochliomyiamacellaria, that is a pest of livestock.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We removed a total of 100 larvae from the wound and identified them, using published methods (4), as larvae of Cochliomyia hominivorax, the New World screwworm fly (Figure, panel B); the larvae have well-differentiated mouthhooks and 12 segments separated by spinose bands with spines arranged in 4 rows and an opened posterior spiracle.
New World Screwworm (NWS) was detected in the Florida Keys in July 2016, infecting endangered male Key deer, but was not officially identified until September 2016 after several deer had to be euthanized due to the severity of their infestations (Delgado, Hennessey, and Hsi, 2016).
In 2016, screwworm flies from South America and the Caribbean (Nordile, 2016a) caused alarm because this invasive species can be detrimental to livestock producers' herds (Nordile, 2016b).
Indeed, World Food Prize Laureates have been at the forefront of almost every significant agricultural breakthrough during this period: from the development of the milk industry in India to the miracle rice perfected at the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines; from the reform of China's agricultural policies to eliminating the cattle plague rinderpest; from the United Nations delivering emergency food shipments around the globe to eradicating the deadly screwworm infestation in the United States; and from expanding modern irrigation in Israel, Jordan, and the Middle East to discovering and unlocking the incredible potential of agricultural biotechnology.
(95) More recently, in 2012 President Barack Obama terminated a congressional-executive agreement relating to screwworm eradication by entering into an agreement with Mexico.
Some worms like the screwworm may be found in the animal's skin.
This method successfully enriched the target [PLA.sub.2] in primary screwworm preparations [25].
Department of Agriculture has a long history with genetically altered biocontrol agents, most notably the innovative screwworm fly produced with sterile-insect techniques that was successfully developed by the USDA more than 70 years ago to eradicate a devastating animal pest.
Rebecca Shuman of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and Jared Beaver of Texas A&M University, updated attendees on the loss of endangered Key deer due to a screwworm infestation.
The screwworm fly, which had had a big impact on fawn survival in parts of the South and Southwest, had finally been brought under control.